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Thread: Having to keep scooter outdoors

  1. #1
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    Having to keep scooter outdoors

    Hi all, new to forums and have questions for anybody who may be in a similar predicament as myself.

    I've had my scooter for five and a half years now, am on the original set of batteries still. Up until summer this year, I was able to keep my scooter in the communal hallway where I live. Unfortunately, a new neighbour in the block took it upon herself to make complaints and I was forced to keep it outside.

    The management company have a very lousy attitude and would not provide me with anywhere to store it. Eventually they agreed to let me keep it on my small patio under a cover but I was not permitted to erect a shed because it wouldn't look nice. They were far more concerned by the appearance of the building than my wellbeing.

    I will point out that all the flats here are owned by different people and the freeholder employs a company to see to the general running of the place. Some owners live in their flats, some, like my landlady, rent them to tenants. I have lived in my flat now for 12 years.

    Back to my scooter. I purchased a heavy duty scooter cover which was no good at protecting against rain so it had to be returned for a refund and I bought a much better cover. However, the cover doesn't protect against cold and yesterday I had to go to hospital and the batteries needed charging on my return. Normally, I would be able to do the hospital trip and then some before I lost even one green light but it went right down to all orange. I'm guessing the colder weather is the reason why, although I am aware that the batteries won't last forever. Up until the temperature dropped, the batteries were prefect.

    As I can't do anything about where it is stored, I was wondering if anybody on here has to store theirs outside and how they protect against extreme cold etc. I am thinking maybe car bonnet insulation blanket might help but not sure.

    I would appreciate any tips/advice on how to protect my lovely scooter during winter. It cost me £5000 and has been fantastic but at this rate, I can't see it surviving winter.

    My family are going to help me build up a case to try and get the management to allow me to at least have a shed. It's still going to get cold but hopefully less risk of condensation. Condensation is going to occur with any plastic type waterproof cover, even the one I have recently bought. I bought an army basha yesterday to prevent drips from the condensation getting onto the scooter. I put that on prior to pulling the cover over it.

    Sorry this is so long, especially for a first post but I figured I would be asked about the things I have covered if I didn't give enough info.

    Thanks in advance for any help. Please excuse any typos, my eyes are tired and keyboard on my tablet is lagging.

    Alison.

  2. #2
    Senior Member AmyS's Avatar
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    Hi Alison,

    I'm going to follow this thread as I live on the ground floor in a block of flats and the only place I could store a scooter is outside. The design of my flat entering it could park it in my corridor but would have to climb over it get in and out. The corridor is straight and I wouldn't be able to turn it to put it in a room. It's very narrow.

    Out of curiosity where/how do you charge it?

    Amy

  3. #3
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    Your landlady's lease will give various rights over the flat and contain various restrictions as to the use of the flat and the communal areas. Many of these rights will pass to you under your tenancy.

    The storage of a scooter in a communal hallway is unlikely to be permitted. It is usual for leases to contain clauses requiring such areas to be kept clear, not least because those areas are typically the fire escape route. For example, a lease I have to hand requires leaseholders and their tenants "Not to park or leave any commercial vehicle caravan boat or trailer of any kind on any part of the Common Parts nor leave any article whatsoever on any part of the Common Parts".

    I cannot see any chance of you getting permission to erect a shed in a communal area as that area is for the enjoyment of all the tenants. Some sort of lean to on your private balcony might be a possibility, but, again, the lease likely contains huge restrictions on what is allowed. The lease I referred to in the previous paragraph requires tenants "Not to alter the external appearance or colour scheme of the Property", "Not to erect any fence wall or other enclosure on the Property" and "Not to do or permit any act or thing which shall be or become a nuisance or cause damage annoyance or inconvenience to the Landlord or the Residents". That last clause is exceptionally broad and there are likely to be limits as to how enforceable it is in practice, but the other restrictions are clear, explicit and appear likely to be enforceable.

    If you are to challenge the management company's refusal to allow you to erect any form of structure to protect your scooter, I suggest asking your landlady for a copy of the lease first if you don't already have one. If the lease expressly prohibits what you want to do, there's little point asking the management company as they will point to the lease and refuse. It is not really the management company's fault - they are required so far as possible to apply the terms of the lease fairly to everyone. If they allow someone to ignore part of the lease they open themselves to complaints from other leaseholders and their tenants.

    You will also need your landlady's permission for any structure unless your tenancy agreement allows you to do what you intend to. Even if you have good relations with you landlady, I suggest getting permission in writing for anything that is allowed.


    Batteries are less efficient when cold. If your batteries are over five years old, the chances are that they are reaching the end of their life on age alone - they don't last forever.

    It depends on the charging system and type of battery, but in many cases you can continue to trickle charge the batteries if you leave the charger plugged in and connected.

    If you can lift the batteries, it might be worth bringing them inside, possibly with the help of a folding luggage trolley. It is possible to get cables made up to charge batteries off the scooter, though this is not something you should attempt to rig up by yourself if you don't know what you are doing, as the amount of energy in the batteries and the charging current are both non-trivial.

  4. #4
    Senior Member AmyS's Avatar
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    Thanks Flymo, glad to see you back.

    Well that's me out, unless I found one small enough to turn in a narrow corridor. Cheers, it all makes sense.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    My first thoughts about the battery reflect Flymos - bring batteries in and charge indoors.

    Second pint. Obtain a can of WD40 and spray electrical points to clean condensation.

    Third point. A shed. Canvas support from neighbours to support your claim for a shed. Many voices in favour can influence the landlord.

    Local press or Twitter. Launch a valid claim about discrimination against disabled people. On access issues against humanity.

  6. #6
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    All current types of batteries are temperature dependant and dont put out as much power when they are cold.
    Recharagble batteries also 'wear out' with time and need to be replaced.

    If you can carry them indoors it will keep then warm and will help. As will some insulation if you have to leave them outside.
    Be careful, when recharging batteries they will get hot and espically if insulated can set on fire.

    One thing that may be a bit off the wall, some years ago my grandfather was having a problem with the battery in his car not working in cold weather, this was before the internet but I found a battery designed for use in light aircraft, bit expensive but the best battery
    for cold weather I have ever seen.

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    I wish i hadn't asked now. I only wanted advice about progecting my scooter against the elements and instead i get told a load of stuff about permission, leases etc etc. I mentioned about building a case but did not ask advice on that. Thanks for making me feel even worse than before. Won't bother again. Goodbye.

  8. #8
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
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    Sorry you feel like that. I presume you mean Flymo's post. Flymo is a much respected member of this forum who does lots of research into giving a in depth answer on all aspects.
    He has gone into everything regarding your scooter storage, over and above what he needed to do.

    Your post is actually an insult to a very intelligent person who is battling against disability and ill health to help as much and to as many members as he can.

  9. #9
    Senior Member AmyS's Avatar
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    hazi1610

    As beau says, Flymo is well respected and conscientious wanting to assist you in every and any way he could.

    I personally found it very informative and widened my knowledge.

    Thanks again Flymo for such an in-depth comprehensive reply. I benefited from this.

    Lighttouch and Nukecad had extremely relevant replies too.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by hazi1610 View Post
    I wish i hadn't asked now. I only wanted advice about progecting my scooter against the elements and instead i get told a load of stuff about permission, leases etc etc. I mentioned about building a case but did not ask advice on that. Thanks for making me feel even worse than before. Won't bother again. Goodbye.
    You brought up the wider issues, so I felt it best to address them. Ultimately, there's no point doing anything, even on a temporary basis, that would contravene your tenancy agreement or your landlady's lease.

    As for dealing with management companies, that's what I spent part of last week doing on behalf of a family member (it looks as if I won on their behalf - the management company appear to be going with my interpretation of the lease and not their own). I was trying to bring my experience to bear for your benefit.


    I appreciate my answer was likely not what you wanted to hear about the broader issues, but I cannot change the nature of leasehold property or the likely terms of your landlady's lease.

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