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Thread: Who watches gardening programmes?

  1. #1
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    Who watches gardening programmes?

    Got to admit, while not being being a Die hard fan of em, i have been watching Love your garden. The things Mr T does do give me idea and hope! that a patch of not very inspiring stuff can be glammed up. Mind you £16,000 for a hot tub??!!! bugger that I'll spend it on raised beds and ramps!

  2. #2
    Senior Member catlover's Avatar
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    I love gardening programmes. I struggle with the practical side of gardening and I'm a bit of a newbie to it all anyway so learn loads and indulge in a spot of fantasy gardening (got the gardening bug a couple of years ago). I do often watch Love your garden but am not a fan of the Titch as I find him very annoying so do tend to avoid programmes with him. I love Gardeners world on a Friday evening but that has a lot to do with the lovely Monty (he can dig my beds any day ) and I love Beechgrove garden.

    I've never got hot tubs tbh. I mean, they're not exactly swimming pools are they? why would anyone want to sit in a glorified bath in their garden?!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    I've not got green fingers but I do like trees!

    One of my favourite is the Japanese Maple as the flora changes colour through the season.

    I do like designing garden layouts. Although I've got lots of low maintenance shrubs I have a big hedge to two sides. These days I can't cut it. I employ a gardener to visit every two weeks to cut the grass and weed as my balance is rubbish these days

    I based my back patio area on an oval lawn, paving bricks, trellis work and raised hidden water features. I draughted the plan out in detail on graph paper and got a landscape garden to put it into action.

    However, I very rarely sit out on the grass which is a waste.

    This afternoon I'm forfeiting a lunch date with my Malaysian girlfriend as my mum surprised me by asking directions to a private house garden viewing. She was going to drive through unknown territory without a map or Sat Nav and return in the rush hour - a recipe for disaster which would end with me being dragged in to help. So I'm chauffeuring her there, and returning to pick her up later. http://www.ngs.org.uk/gardens/find-a....aspx?id=30119

  4. #4
    Senior Member catlover's Avatar
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    If I had a garden I don't think I'd have any grass. Maybe a wildflower meadow. I would definitely not go for a central lawn surrounded by borders. So boring and I don't want to sit and look at the plants in the distance I want to be sat in the middle of the plants. I could sit for hours just watching bees flit from flower to flower. I'd go for lots of plants to attract wildlife and maybe a pond.... oh it's nice fantasizing! I'll have to make do with my containers. I think my tomatoes are finally starting to ripen - they seem to have been green for ages with nothing happening.

    Lighttouch - I love trees. I am not at all knowledgeable but just love the majesty of a large tree, the texture of the tree trunk, the different shades of green of leaves (who knew there were so many shades of green? 50 shades of green!), the falling of leaves in autumn etc. I could never live above the tree line or somewhere without trees. I went to Tiree once in the Hebrides and whilst it was lovely (but cold) there wasn't a single tree as it is above the tree line. I couldn't live there. Just call me a tree hugger

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    Watching these programmes has made me realise in future the design will have to change drastically for me. Less grass, more hard landscaping (wheelchair does not do grass). Raised beds. Growing veg. (B'friend needs organic food - cheaper to grow yr own.)
    Perennials. They come back (we like somat for nothing). As the lady on LYG said.....these plants have to work for their inclusion!
    Thankfully the boyfriend is pretty knowledgable on this stuff

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    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Cat lover, I wonder how I knew that you'd be into 50 shades of green!

    My favourite types of plants are variegated - I have a lovely Virginia creeper that changes to bright red in Autumn. I have a fire thorn bush that produces bright red berries in winter. Loads of low-maintenance shrubs and conifer trees, plum, apple trees etc.

    Reddivine - having raised beds for easy maintenance is a great idea. A cheap way of achieving that is by using hardwood railway sleepers to form walls - looks rural too. http://railwaysleepersuk.co.uk

    My dad passed away back in March and my mum took his ashes to Wythenshawe Park and scattered them in three areas that have sentimental value. Yesterday she told me that she's buying a sappling Oak tree that the Council will plant in the park later this month. She prefers celebrating my dad's passing with giving life rather than a headstone. She wants me to plant another Oak tree in the same area when she passes on - it makes me feel sad thinking about it but who said romance is dead.

    Catlover - Another wonderful National Trust place that has an abundance of trees is Bodnant Gardens in North Wales (a few miles from Llandudno). They have flowing water. Enormous Redwood trees that must be at least 100 years old. http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/bodnant-garden/

    Last edited by Lighttouch; 17-07-14 at 09:47.

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    Senior Member deebee's Avatar
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    what a lovely idea (the sapling oak) I have visions now of a great oak tree in future years
    when an uncle of mine passed, I was very surprised to get a cheque and letter from his wife 3 months after saying that Uncle Phil wants you to have this and wants you to buy something you need for the house
    I didnt need anything for the house,but I did have a stack of bills to pay and had been worrying,but felt guilty using it all without buying something to remember him by
    Any way, there was a scruffy bit by my front door,not really a garden, just a strip that passing cats,foxes kept messing,so I bought some purple slate, a nice big pot and a lavender
    We always say in the evening, just gonna go water Uncle Phils lavender
    I think he would be pleased as he was a very keen gardener

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    Quote Originally Posted by reddivine View Post
    Got to admit, while not being being a Die hard fan of em, i have been watching Love your garden. The things Mr T does do give me idea and hope! that a patch of not very inspiring stuff can be glammed up. Mind you £16,000 for a hot tub??!!! bugger that I'll spend it on raised beds and ramps!
    I am currentlty converting my backyard into a urban farm.

    I will have 3 types of livestock: Chickens, Ghost Carp & Rabbits. I plan on breeding them as Pets. These animals will serve a purpose of creating enough manure to feed my plants.

    I currently have 2 green houses and I am in the process of making channels of raised beds between them which can have cold frames to put over during winter time.

    Inside the green houses there will be a aquaponics set up. This is a method of using fish & hydroponics to create a good growing enviroment for plants. I will be able to produce cabbages, lettuces and other forms of salad in 30 days.

    I plan on selling my produce to the local community at rock bottom prices. basically non-profit. It will be sort of a way to show people that I recognize that working families also have it tough and even though I'm mentally insane I can still do something for the community.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Hi Sociapath sounds a great idea. Just a point - even not-for-profit organisations are allowed to make a profit. The difference being that the profits are ploughed back into the business which in turn improves the customer service.

    With the little extra you make you can buy more fish etc which will increase your productivity and sere more people.

    You'll have to post a photo or two - sounds an interesting business idea.

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    IMG_20140717_155315.jpgIMG_20140717_155306.jpg

    My mornings work. BEFORE it got too hot. Lavender in the pot and the other container (old supermarket crate.) has carex, perstemons and impatiens. I went to B&Q where they are reducing stuff. Perennials and hardy stock (we like easy to manage)


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