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Thread: 'Trainee' disabled newby seeking advice from 'well practiced' disabled scooter users

  1. #11
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    There's another point I didn't mention, but need to take in to consideration.. my animals. I've ran my own small animal and bird rescue and rehab sanctuary for over 20 years, and still doing it, although on a much smaller scale now due to what's happening with me. Anyway, remember I mentioned I rather liked the look of the liteway 8? Well, one of the reasons I like the look of it, is underneath the seat is a basket, and I'm thinking remove the basket, and lo and behold, room for a pet carrier ! (I seem to spend half my life and 99% of my money at the vets, and with the taxi costs being close on a tenner per return journey, then three saved taxi expenses would pay for the inoculations on one rescue rabbit.) Obviously I would cushion and pad the carrier for the animal's comfort and never transport a serious injured/abused/sick creature this way, but room on the base where the carrier could rest is important. Or, could I have a customised attachment fitted, preferably on the front? Sorry to add another complication, but bearing in mind that this week alone, transport to and from the vet has cost me close on £100 (been a hard hitting week with animal health problems and new animals being brought to me to help. I'm totally self funded so if my scooter can help me save those costly fares it would be such a blessing!

  2. #12
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
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    My dog sits on the footplate of my scooter with no problems. I have also carried boxes of things on there with my feet on the footrests that are on the bodywork above the footplate. Majority of scooters have the space for that on the footplate. So there would be space easily for a carrier without having to make any adaptations..

  3. #13
    Senior Member catlover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firebird View Post
    Catlover and OP - I would not recommend the eclipse although I am very pleased with mine. It is a class 2 boot scooter and has solid tyres and no suspension. Although it is extremely well built and reliable, I managed to manoeuvre up and down Foxton Locks with no difficulty (rather scary though!), will go over slightly rough grass etc., I don't think it would be comfortable enough for someone with a sensitive bum.

    Another suggestion to make seating more comfy is to use a waffle cushion. These are used to avoid pressure sores and I have found mine very useful as I tend to sit for lengthy periods of time. I bought mine off eBay as they were less than half the price of the ones advertised by the mobility aids companies. You would be looking for the ehob waffle cushion, inflatable.
    It sounds as though it wouldn't suit the OP but I am after a boot scooter that will cope with a bit of outdoor terrain. The difficulty is that it's hard to judge the comfort of a scooter from a short trial run. are there places that let you try these for a day/week or something to see how you get on with a particular model?

    My main use for a scooter will be to use it in shops, garden centres and places like that. But I dont want something too small and light as I'd also like to be able to use it outdoors in places like parks, national trust properties, zoos etc. I hire a scooter when I can at places like that but many have no scooter hire or you have to book well in advance which means no going somewhere on a whim. It needs to fit into the car but with a hoist. My problem is that I have problems with my back and need any scooter to give me adequate support but smaller, boot scooters tend not to have the suspension of bigger ones so I may find them uncomfortable.

  4. #14
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    Have you considered a powerchair, catlover? It would give you a full range of seating options, including specialist seating for your individual needs, and there are models intended solely or primarily for outdoor use.

    Most powerchairs are indoor/outdoor models which are weighted to indoor use (the primary use is listed first), but it might be worth investigating outdoor/indoor chairs or outdoor only chairs in your position. To get you started, why not look at Invacare's outdoor/indoor chairs?

    I have had few problems getting my indoor/outdoor chair around outdoor places. The few places I have struggled are where any wheeled mobility aid will struggle (usually sloping ground, mud, sand and gravel).


    Most "boot scooters" are intended for those who can load them by taking them apart. If that amount of bending is out of the question, there are scooters that can be hoisted or driven up a ramp into a vehicle, but transporting any scooter with minimal to no breaking down tends to require a large vehicle. A powerchair is typically more manoeuvrable than a scooter, and if you have a good enough seating system on it, you may not need to transfer out of the chair when indoors.

    One of the drawbacks with a powerchair is that it does require proper measurement to get the right dimensions - they tend not to be a "one size fits most" solution unlike a scooter. The key dimensions are seat width and seat depth, which tend to be fixed - most other parameters can be reconfigured. Increasingly, modern powerchairs are modular, so you can replace the seat module with one of different dimensions.

  5. #15
    Senior Member catlover's Avatar
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    I have considered a powerchair and I think that eventually that is what I will need, but at the moment I think a scooter would suit my needs best as I can walk and like the fact that with a scooter I can park it up at busy or inaccessible places then do a bit of walking, even if only a very short distance. That is good for my back too as sitting for too long causes back pain so it's good to be able to be able to change posture now and again. I also find it easier to transport stuff around on a scooter. When I used a manual wheelchair I had a bag on the back and a smaller one underneath the seat but I would struggle these days to twist or bend enough for anything like that. I'm sure there would be solutions but I find the basket on the front of a scooter very handy to put stuff in and usually enough room on footrest to put shopping.

    I'd need a hoist for a scooter as there is no way I could take it apart and put it in the boot - both the bending and the lifting would be beyond me. Another reason I want a fairly lightweight one though so that I don't need a huge hoist.

  6. #16
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    I understand. I was thinking more from the point of practicality, that a complete or mostly complete scooter is going to require a large vehicle to slew the scooter on the hoist. You may need a van to get a load area that is wide, long and high enough. Complete scooters do not always have tie down points on the frame, which is another problem with transporting a complete scooter.

    A powerchair with the backrest folded or removed is rather smaller than a scooter.


    The boot scooters I'm familiar with are designed to be loaded in several parts. The Invacare Colibri user manual explains how to take that scooter apart from page 31 onwards - remove the seat, remove the battery box, remove the drive unit (rear wheels, axle and motor) from the rest of the frame and fold the tiller flat.

    Unless you have a medium (Ford Transit Connect etc.) to full size van (Ford Transit, Mercedes Sprinter etc.), I think you will have to remove the scooter's seat and fold the tiller to get the scooter into the available head height. From what you say, your health precludes any further disassembly. You'll probably have to hoist the scooter using an adapter fitted to the seat post, which might require a reinforced seat post to be fitted.

    You won't get away with that lightweight a hoist - you could well have 50+kg hanging from the hoist.


    I'd give one or two of the companies that fit hoists a ring to see if they have any suggestions about your options for hoisting a complete scooter.


    To give an idea of just how much space hoisting a scooter can take, I found a picture on the Autoadapt web site of a scooter being hoisted into an MPV. Part of the rear seat is folded down , and I expect this is because that length is needed for the scooter. Once the scooter is in the car and tied down, you've got to find somewhere to safely carry the scooter's seat.

    You could contact Autoadapt to see if they have any scooter / hoist / car or van combinations they particularly recommend.


    It has to be about what you want, but if you're going to go to all this trouble and expense, I wonder if you'd be better off going straight to a powerchair which might allow you to drive a smaller car or van. You can park a powerchair outside and set off on foot - I've abandoned my chair when there's no accessible loos.

    Transporting stuff is harder in a powerchair - there's only so much you can carry over the back of the chair, on the front of the frame and on your lap.


    Please treat this as brainstorming and nothing more - I'm just throwing out ideas about something you've clearly reflected on long and hard.

  7. #17
    Senior Member firebird's Avatar
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    I have used my eclipse for the types of places you have listed. The only restriction is really loose surfaces such as sand, gravel, pebbles and really rough grassland. The seat and back are quite firm but reasonably comfy and the arms can be removed. It would need quite a large car with a sizeable boot if you needed a hoist.

  8. #18
    Senior Member catlover's Avatar
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    Thanks for the links. It is going to take a lot of thought to get the right thing that I can get into the car and which also suits my mobility needs. I know I will need a pretty large car to get it in without dismantling. I'm happy to fold down the seat and lower the tiller, especially if I can do the latter with the scooter in mid air so that it's easier to reach. The difficulty will be, as you say, getting a boot opening that is big enough for the scooter to be manoeuvred through. Hoist wise I am hoping that something like the autochair 80kg mini hoist will be sufficient as I believe the Eclipse weighs about 50kg fully assembled.

    Room inside the boot should be less of a problem as can fold down the rear seats. I was hoping something like the Skoda Yeti would be big enough. I've been looking lately at the Peugeot 3008 but not sure the shape of the boot opening will be right.

    I am hoping to go to the next motability roadshow at Harrogate in August with the main aim of looking at hoists and asking questions. I went to the Manchester one a couple of months ago but didn't have time to take a proper look at hoists or ask the suppliers any questions.

  9. #19
    Senior Member firebird's Avatar
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    What about contacting TGA for some advice on cars and hoists. I'm sure you won't be the first to need some suggestions. I had a Volvo xc60 on motability, sadly no longer on the scheme, which had a huge boot and a low loading height. The Antara I currently have is the opposite, a smaller boot with a high loading height. Good luck, let us know when you've found your ideal car and hoist!

  10. #20
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    I have a Pride Go Go which fits in the back of an MPV (I have a Scenic but I know it fits into other cars) with no dismantling needed. I do fold down the tiller and the seat; mostly so that I can use rear view mirror but it will go in without doing this. It's no problem to do this when the scooter is at mid hoist, just before it goes into the car. I think your challenge is probably to find a scooter that is comfortable first and pthen think about car models. It's a funny process, need to start with something otherwise just keep going round in circles. Or maybe that was just me!!

    Btw my GoGo copes fine with national trust paths etc. I've had mine for 5 years and it's done miles and miles. Sounds like you need something more supportive though - think I do too next time.

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