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Thread: Disabilty/carers benefits were there to take the strain off NHS services

  1. #1
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    Disabilty/carers benefits were there to take the strain off NHS services

    I was always under the impression that disabilty and carers benefits were there to take the strain off NHS services.
    To assist with the extra costs involved with having a disabilty, and to give disabled people some independence.
    So won't cuts put more strain on health services?
    Carers cannot claim carer benefit if you do not have some kind of disabilty benefit , or are considered fit for work.
    There will be a far reaching effect on a NHS and SS.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackball View Post
    I was always under the impression that disabilty and carers benefits were there to take the strain off NHS services.
    To assist with the extra costs involved with having a disabilty, and to give disabled people some independence.
    So won't cuts put more strain on health services?
    Carers cannot claim carer benefit if you do not have some kind of disabilty benefit , or are considered fit for work.
    There will be a far reaching effect on a NHS and SS.


    DLA was introduced to help people in work or getting jobs, the care part was to allow you to pay for some care in the home or at work.

    IB as is ESA is to allow you to feed your self and your family.

    If your sick or disabled then your GP and the NHS it's their to help you, I suspect if you had no money you may end up in the NHS more through starvation.

    But no I do not think getting benefits is about the NHS it's about you or your family having enough to get the basics .


    I would use the NHS in the same way as I do now, I need treatment I'm off now in a minute to have a Biopsy on a lump, I will go to have check up with my consultant, I suspect if they stopped my benefits I'd be using the NHS less since I'd be dead through starvation and being homeless, maybe that's the idea....

  3. #3
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    Taking the strain off the NHS means educating people on how to use the service properly. A prime example is the recent bout of hot weather. Ambulance calls and visits to A and E increased a lot because people do not follow simple advice about using sunscreen, staying out of the sun and drinking plenty of fluids. Add to that the people that go to A and E for the simplest things, instead of seeing their GP or using a walk in centre etc. If people are concerned about a health problem but know it is not an emergency, they should see their own doctor or go to a walk in centre for advice. If it is a serious problem they will be told to go to hospital. Also there is the problem of people missing appts and not informing the hospital.
    Good luck with your biopsy Treborc, hope all goes well.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.

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    But if some benefits e.g higher care in DLA go, the CA cannot be claimed. HB is also reduced if these benefits go. There are a few examples of linked eligibilty.

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    I understand what you are saying blackball, and I am sure that reciept of DLA can take some of the strain from the NHS. But a lot of sick/disabled people need regular hospital treatment/surgeries etc, regardless of having a carer, in those cases it makes no difference.
    As for SS, it is getting harder and harder for people to get help as services are being cut dramatically by local councils etc to save money. That is down to central government cutting budgets to LA's and the knock on effect of the cuts. People are having to wait longer to be assessed, then are being told that there is not enough money in the kitty to provide all the help they need.
    Unfortunately, when it comes to saving money, be it in central or local goverment it is the people who need the most help that usually suffer the most.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.

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    There is also some kind of living alone allowance linked to DLA. The criteria for this is that absolutely nobody lives near you basically.Even if they share the front door of a house you cannot qualify. Whether you know them or not. Don't know anyone who could never get it. Will PIP still have this.

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    I don't know about that allowance, sorry. As for PIP, it is anyones guess as they keep moving the goalposts it seems. All I know is that there was a challenge to the 20 metre rule, which I think is still in review. I am still unsure of when I will have to claim PIP, I think it is sometime this year and I am dreading it. I know I meet the criteria, even the 20 metre rule, but it is still a stressful, worrying time.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.

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    Yes the waiting and all the 'Daily Mail' style information, are causing me to be in a kind of angst state.

    There is indeed a living alone supplement.
    Also if elderly, and what they define as living alone, then no council tax has to be paid (regardless of benefits).
    Even a lodger or someone you despise and have not spoken to in 40 years is in the same building --- they are considered a carer.

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    I just asked at the charity I help out at the main adviser said he had never heard of any benefits for living alone above the normal benefits for people, so if you know what it's called it would be interesting.

    I have never heard of any benefits linked to DLA, DLA is a stand alone benefits or PIP's as it is now.

  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=Blackball;43859]Yes the waiting and all the 'Daily Mail' style information, are causing me to be in a kind of angst state.

    There is indeed a living alone supplement.
    Also if elderly, and what they define as living alone, then no council tax has to be paid (regardless of benefits).
    Even a lodger or someone you despise and have not spoken to in 40 years is in the same building --- they are considered a carer.[/QUOTE


    You mean this :


    Living Alone

    To get the increase in your payment you must live completely alone. However, there are some exceptions:

    If you are living in an extension of a family member's home, for example, in a granny flat, you can qualify for the increase if you can show that you have facilities to cook and eat alone. You must also have your own living/dining and sleeping accommodation.

    You may also qualify as living alone if you are aged or infirm and have a friend or relative to stay for security reasons at night-time only. The friend or relative must not contribute to the household financially.

    The increase may also be payable if you live alone during the day but stay with relatives or friends at night or if you live alone during the week but have a relative to stay at the weekend (the living alone condition is satisfied as long as the relative has a permanent home address elsewhere).

    You will also qualify if you live alone but occasionally take in paying guests (for example, during a local festival). However, if you run a bed and breakfast business (even for part of the year) you will not qualify.

    People who live in sheltered accommodation may qualify if they are regarded as living independently within the institution. The Department of Social Protection provides a list of hostels/homes where Living Alone Increase is payable. You will not qualify if you share dormitory accommodation with others, or have supervision or nursing care round-the clock.

    People who live in nursing homes will not qualify as they cannot be regarded as living completely or mainly alone.


    If you are 66 years or over and live alone, you will qualify if you are getting one of the following payments

    State Pension (Contributory)
    State Pension (Non-Contributory)
    Widow's, Widower's or Surviving Civil Partner's (Contributory) Pension
    Widow's/Widower's Pension under the Occupational Injuries Benefit Scheme
    Incapacity Supplement

    You will also qualify if you are under 66, live alone and are getting Disability Allowance, Invalidity Pension, Incapacity Supplement and Blind Pension.

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