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Thread: Chronic fatigue syndrome rosie rgains independence following tga mobility scooter win

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    TGA Mobility
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    Chronic fatigue syndrome rosie regains independence following TGAmobility scooter win

    CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME ROSIE REGAINS INDEPENDENCE FOLLOWING NATIONAL TGA MOBILITY SCOOTER COMPETITION WIN

    Rosie Chappell, 36 from Swindon who lives with mobility-restricting Fibromyalgia and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, has regained her freedom after winning a TGA Eclipse mobility scooter in a national competition.


    TGArosieChappell.jpg

    Despite living with severely limited mobility and constant pain, Rosie is a fantastic, bubbly individual who lives in Westlea, West Swindon. Originally born in Bristol, she has lived in Swindon for over four years with her husband and is assisted at home by various carers. She lives with continual long-term tiredness and pain that severely affects her everyday life. Rosie had spent over a year searching and saving for a mobility scooter before winning this competition, as independent walking outside was extremely limited. She was desperate for a solution so when she saw the TGA competition in Able magazine, Rosie entered and managed to win the top prize, a free Eclipse mobility scooter. This fantastic result has also meant that Rosie could visit her mother independently in hospital, as she was allowed to use her new compact mobility scooter between wards.

    Rosie explains: “My neurological condition means that I have been pretty much housebound for many years, mainly relying on my husband and/or carers to help me physically get out and about. I can still drive my car on a very limited basis but walking with my husband, especially in the local countryside and parks was simply never going to happen. That was until I won this national competition! I am so thrilled as I have never won anything like this before and my new Eclipse has already made a massive difference to my life. Thanks to the TGA Eclipse and my husband John, I have finally been able to fulfill our simple dream of going out for gentle strolls together. It has also enabled me to visit my Mum in hospital without having to be pushed in a wheelchair, which was great. On the better days with my health conditions, I now have this amazing way of being independent.”

    “My new Eclipse was delivered by such a lovely man, Shaun Finch from TGA and has come exactly at the right time bearing in mind the current weather. John and I have found the Eclipse very easy to take further afield in the boot of his BMW 5 series saloon car. In fact my husband commented how much easier it is to put in the boot than the wheelchair. The fact that it quickly dismantles is brilliant and we still have plenty of space in the boot when it’s onboard.”

    Rosie concludes: “I’d been to the Naidex exhibition before winning this competition and was already impressed with the TGA range. The fact that I’ve ended up winning one of these for free is a real bonus! I was given a choice of colours so went for a happy, vibrant green and my Eclipse is nippy and easy to drive. Hopefully I can take it on holiday soon as I could have really done with it on my vacation earlier in the year. The fact that I have a disability, even though I do not look disabled, still surprises some people, especially when they consider my age. I think it is important that mobility equipment continues to develop for a younger audience. Thanks so much TGA for making my year!”

    The TGA Eclipse is the UK’s leading compact scooter that quickly dissembles into three easy-to-lift parts that slot into the boot of an average sized car. It has a range of up to 15km (9miles) and is compliant for travel on buses and trams, managed by operators who have signed up to a new accessibility code.

    www.tgamobility.co.uk



    Picture caption: Shaun Finch presents Rosie Chappell, 36 from Swindon and Able national competition winner, with her new Eclipse mobility scooter from TGA.
    Last edited by TGA Mobility; 23-07-13 at 10:49.

  2. #2
    Senior Member susieboots's Avatar
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    Fantastic, congratulations, and now you can live again! I have the same condition, so I know how debilitating it is and how it restricts everything you do, particularly outings.

    This scooter will change your life hon, I wish you many happy hours trundling about

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    Quote Originally Posted by susieboots View Post
    Fantastic, congratulations, and now you can live again! I have the same condition, so I know how debilitating it is and how it restricts everything you do, particularly outings.

    This scooter will change your life hon, I wish you many happy hours trundling about
    SB,
    So you have Fibro and CFS. Many do. Didn't CFS change to CFIDS ?

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    Boy has thing changed from the Day the Sun newspapers use to call it Yuppie flu, I can even remember when the Labour party sat in government and stated Yuppie flu was a national disgrace.

    Thank god people now know different....

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    Senior Member susieboots's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wobble1 View Post
    SB,
    So you have Fibro and CFS. Many do. Didn't CFS change to CFIDS ?
    Hi wobble, when you have Fibromyalgia, you also have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. The two seem be hand in hand. My consultant said I have a particularly severe case - trust me! Sadly we don't get any quality sleep, and don't go into REM sleep, and constantly wake through the night, therefore we are never refreshed and feel we need a good night sleep all the time. You know how you feel at night when you are exhausted and really read for bed? - that's how a fibro person is 24 hours per day. On top of that is the constant muscle pain and weakness. I could go on, but I am sure it has been a well trodden path.

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    Quote Originally Posted by susieboots View Post
    Hi wobble, when you have Fibromyalgia, you also have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. The two seem be hand in hand. My consultant said I have a particularly severe case - trust me! Sadly we don't get any quality sleep, and don't go into REM sleep, and constantly wake through the night, therefore we are never refreshed and feel we need a good night sleep all the time. You know how you feel at night when you are exhausted and really read for bed? - that's how a fibro person is 24 hours per day. On top of that is the constant muscle pain and weakness. I could go on, but I am sure it has been a well trodden path.
    I would defy anyone to tell me the difference between ME, CFIDS and Fibro. They all share very similar symptoms, no known cause, effective treatment or cure.
    They are a truly mysterious, yet horrific illness.

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    Senior Member acheron's Avatar
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    Hi wobble yes fibro/cfs is very strange I have both I started with both after a strong biological drug that suppresses your immune system was used to treat crohn's disease didn't do anything for my crohns but been left with fibro/cfs also on immune suppressant drugs now so may be it is something to do with a compromised immune system I suppose we won't really know until more research is done but yes it's very debilitating xx

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    Senior Member susieboots's Avatar
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    Yes, the immune system is compromised. I started with symptoms after having viral encephalitis and meningitis. I didn't know what it was or why it was happening. When it started getting worse, my GP said it needs investigating, and my Rheumatologist did the ANA test and points on the body test etc. It's extremely debilitating and getting worse. Painkillers (was Gabapentin, now Pregabalin) do help a little but not really effective.

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    Senior Member acheron's Avatar
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    Hi Susie it is horrid and the fatigue OMG never feel like I'm fully alert and the energy just drains away from you I once told my DR that it was like having a glass of water in your hand and just pouring the water down the sink thats it energy gone and who knows when you'll get some back xx

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    That's why they wanted to change CFS to CFIDS , chronic fatigue immune deficiency syndrome, as it better described the illness.
    Viral infection seems to be the most common trigger, directly or indirectly through contamination, such as blood transfusion etc.
    The last I heard was it was some adaption of HHV6 which is part of a family including the AIDS virus. One thing for certain is it's not a MH problem, although the DWP advise ATOS it is likely to be a MH issue

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