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Thread: Bedroom Tax for social tenants

  1. #1
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    Bedroom Tax for social tenants

    At the risk of being called a Tory supporter, I would like to just clear up a media myth.
    This "Bedroom Tax" is something private tenants have been paying for years, during which it was widely accepted to be grossly unfair.
    It is only now that LA's and HA's have been dragged into the unfairness that this is an issue. Not because it's unfair on their tenants but because they don't want the responsibility of dealing with the new legislation.
    This shouldn't be about just social tenants but ALL tenants. Either we all pay or better still none.

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    I could'nt agree with you more Wobble1. All or none. My mum in law is a private tenant & lives in a 2 bed house. She pays what is now called "Bedroom Tax" She is 89 years old and we chose the property she lives in because of its close proximity to our house and if she became ill there would always be a spare room for me to be able to stay with her. Unfortunately she had to give up her 2 bed council property when she lost her husband 5 years ago. Because it was under a different council area she had no choice but to go for private rent.

    I tried to explain to the LA why she needed 2 rooms but it fell on deaf ears.

  3. #3
    Senior Member RaeUK's Avatar
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    Ironically, Titch, your Mother-in-Law would now have been allowed to remain in her original home ...

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    Agree as well Wobble. I don't rent but feel this disparity is the reason why there hasn't been mass nationwide support for the protests, and noticed when reading the FAcebook campiagn it only mentioned it beign unfair for social renters which wouldn't have hlped. Felt the reported turnout figures on protests were lower than expected. PS I've never voted and never would vote Tory.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seriouslyfedup View Post
    Agree as well Wobble. I don't rent but feel this disparity is the reason why there hasn't been mass nationwide support for the protests, and noticed when reading the FAcebook campiagn it only mentioned it beign unfair for social renters which wouldn't have hlped. Felt the reported turnout figures on protests were lower than expected. PS I've never voted and never would vote Tory.
    Media hype. I think the media these days are as guilty as politicians for exaggerated sensationalism.
    I spoke to some people who were going on a protest and they didn't know about private renters.
    Social renters will have to pay £14pw for an extra room, private renters pay £35pw for no extra rooms.

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    Senior Member RaeUK's Avatar
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    That obfuscates the real difference between private rented accommodation and the assured tenancy of low cost social housing. Those in the former are far more mobile and can - to a degree - pick and choose their housing. Those of us in the latter can't. Generally speaking, we have a far smaller pool of choice and, in effect, go where we are told to. Switching properties is problematic although, granted, it is slightly easier than it used to be. However, for example, if you are in arrears you aren't allowed to exchange your HA property for another.
    To put it mildly, private renting and low cost social housing are as different as chalk and cheese.
    Last edited by RaeUK; 05-04-13 at 04:03.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RaeUK View Post
    That obfuscates the real difference between private rented accommodation and the assured tenancy of low cost social housing. Those in the former are far more mobile and can - to a degree - pick and choose their housing. Those of us in the latter can't. Generally speaking, we have a far smaller pool of choice and, in effect, go where we are told to. Switching properties is problematic although, granted, it is slightly easier than it used to be. However, for example, if you are in arrears you aren't allowed to exchange your HA property for another.
    To put it mildly, private renting and low cost social housing are as different as chalk and cheese.
    Sorry Rae I'm not sure what that means.
    Are you saying that people in private should pay more from their benefit as they have more choice as to where they live?

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    Senior Member RaeUK's Avatar
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    I'm not saying whether they should or they shouldn't, but in effect that is how it works. Private renting, with all the benefits that brings, will always attract a higher premium. Rents will always be higher than the same sized social housing property.
    I believe - and I could be incorrect - Housing Benefit was set to a certain level. This is fair. Now, we have a system where I'll be penalised because the property I was allocated happens to have a second bedroom. Yet the rent the property attracts is less than the sum Housing Benefit will happily pay for a one bedroom property in the private sector.
    Last edited by RaeUK; 05-04-13 at 15:22.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RaeUK View Post
    I'm not saying whether they should or they shouldn't, but in effect that is how it works. Private renting, with all the benefits that brings, will always attract a higher premium. Rents will always be higher than the same sized social housing property.
    I believe - and I could be incorrect - Housing Benefit was set to a certain level. This is fair. Now, we have a system where I'll be penalised because the property I was allocated happens to have a second bedroom. Yet the rent the property attracts is less than the sum Housing Benefit will happily pay for a one bedroom property in the private sector.
    Most I know are in private because they can't get social. I don't know anyone wanting to move from social to private.
    Most private do not accept people on benefits, which leaves the landlords from hell, in run down condition and areas.
    It must be different where you live.

  10. #10
    Senior Member RaeUK's Avatar
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    Probably, wobble. I moved into the property just over 15 years ago when I was homeless. Back then, it was basically a case of take that property or nothing. As it was in a rural village with few amenities, the HA couldn't rent it for love nor money. I took it as I was quite happy to have somewhere to live and call home. Fast forward to today and I'm being penalised for taking on something nobody else wanted.

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