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Thread: Five Stories: the harsh realities of the Government's "bedroom tax"

  1. #1
    vikstar
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    Five Stories: the harsh realities of the Government's "bedroom tax"

    Five Stories: the harsh realities of the Government's "bedroom tax"

    http://www.newstatesman.com/politics...ts-bedroom-tax

  2. #2
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
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    It doesn't affect me but my heart goes out to those that it does.

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    Senior Member galeforce81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beau View Post
    It doesn't affect me but my heart goes out to those that it does.
    where im living, we're over occupied but i'd be happier living as i am than making someone move that really needs the bedroom.

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    This is anti-government propaganda and is factually inaacurate. There is no such thing as a bedroom tax. What there is, is an attempt to not pay benefits to people over and above what they need to live. On top of that, anyone receiveing any level of DLA or PIP is exempt from this, so the first two cases will not lose out. (I couldn't be bothered to read the rest, it is probably in the same vein.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithl View Post
    This is anti-government propaganda and is factually inaacurate. There is no such thing as a bedroom tax. What there is, is an attempt to not pay benefits to people over and above what they need to live. On top of that, anyone receiveing any level of DLA or PIP is exempt from this, so the first two cases will not lose out. (I couldn't be bothered to read the rest, it is probably in the same vein.)
    Wrong m8! Being in receipt of any award of DLA alone, will not exempt you.

  6. #6
    vikstar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithl View Post
    This is anti-government propaganda and is factually inaacurate. There is no such thing as a bedroom tax. What there is, is an attempt to not pay benefits to people over and above what they need to live. On top of that, anyone receiveing any level of DLA or PIP is exempt from this, so the first two cases will not lose out. (I couldn't be bothered to read the rest, it is probably in the same vein.)
    If we are talking about "FACTS" you are factually incorrect.

    DLA or any future PIP recipients are NOT exempt from the "Bedroom Tax", unless above State Pension age. ("pensioners")

    So it is you who needs to get their facts straight.
    Last edited by vikstar; 14-02-13 at 17:08.

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithl View Post
    This is anti-government propaganda and is factually inaacurate. There is no such thing as a bedroom tax. What there is, is an attempt to not pay benefits to people over and above what they need to live. On top of that, anyone receiveing any level of DLA or PIP is exempt from this, so the first two cases will not lose out. (I couldn't be bothered to read the rest, it is probably in the same vein.)
    Wrong m8! Being in receipt of any award of DLA alone, will not exempt you.

    Any person demed to be under occupying will have to pay

  8. #8
    davewhit
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithl View Post
    This is anti-government propaganda and is factually inaacurate. There is no such thing as a bedroom tax. What there is, is an attempt to not pay benefits to people over and above what they need to live. On top of that, anyone receiveing any level of DLA or PIP is exempt from this, so the first two cases will not lose out. (I couldn't be bothered to read the rest, it is probably in the same vein.)
    I agree with the others your so wrong, but just in case there has been another U turn have you a link to your source ?

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    Lol Your as fst as me vikstar

  10. #10
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    Keithl, hope your not trolling mate.....

    In April 2013 the new under-occupancy rules will come into force for tenants in the social rented sector (SRS) who claim housing benefit. This is meant to bring entitlement to housing benefit for social housing tenants into line with the entitlement for tenants in the private rented sector (PRS). Despite the many differences between the two tenures, and the fact that most under-occupying SRS tenants are living in the same homes in which they have brought up their families, ’market forces’ are to be imposed and tenants are being warned that they will have to pay a percentage of their rent for each extra room they are deemed to be under-occupying: 14% for one bedroom, 25% for two. In real terms this could be anything from £14 to £40 per week.

    The Government have admitted that they know there are not enough smaller properties within the SRS to enable people to downsize – in contrast to provision in the under-regulated PRS where there is an abundance of (expensive) choice. They know that any saving for the nation’s housing benefit bill depends, paradoxically, upon people not moving, staying put and ‘absorbing’ the benefit cut. Indeed, if everyone downsized to the PRS, the housing benefit bill would be substantially higher. They claim the change will incentivise people to work. But they also know, as made clear by the DWP’s own Equality Impact Assessment, that over two-thirds of the households affected include a tenant with a long-term illness or disability.

    Despite fierce lobbying by all interested organisations for an exemption from the benefit cut for people in receipt of Employment and Support Allowance (Support group) and/or Disability Living Allowance/Personal Independence Payment, the only current exemption is for a minority of tenants who can prove they require constant overnight care. For everyone else the ‘tax’ (benefit cut) takes immediate effect on 1 April 2013. Those affected include: people who may already have significant adaptations (some paid for out of their own pocket), or who may be on the long waiting list for adaptations, or who may only need ‘occasional’ overnight care, or who may need an extra room for bulky medical equipment, or couples who need separate rooms due to disability or health difficulties, or people with mental health conditions such as agoraphobia, or people with degenerative conditions who may soon need that extra room for a carer but not quite yet, or people who will end up in residential care if they have to move away from formal and informal care networks, or people with cancer, lung disease, liver disease or other life-limiting illnesses who cannot face the added upheaval of moving house at the worst time of their life, or sick and disabled people whose home has become their whole world; all will face a cut in housing benefit and risk rent arrears.

    Disabled people have to cope with benefit reductions and higher costs all the time, but this cut is somewhat different, as rent simply has to be paid, no matter what, to avoid arrears.

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