Page 7 of 25 FirstFirst ... 5678917 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 241

Thread: Covid vaccination.

  1. #61
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    671
    That's a bit odd!

    Did they give you the second appointment time? or do you have to call them again in three months?

  2. #62
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    West Cumbria (Lake District)
    Posts
    9,722
    That sticker could even make you a target for angry people who haven't been able to get their elderly/disbled relatives vaccinated yet.

    Yet another example of government lack of thought and stupidity.
    Probably all they thought about was that a sticker would look 'good' in newspaper photographs.

    You've probably guessed that I'm getting fed up of the gov running the covid response as if it was an advertising campaign.
    Three word slogans such as they are using for the Covid briefings started with Mars bars - Work, Rest, and Play. (I believe that Maggie T was working for the company that came up with it).
    I suppose that's what happens when your advisers are business people.
    I don't know everything. - But I'm good at searching for, and finding, stuff.

    Migration from ESA to Universal Credit- Click here for information.

  3. #63
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,973
    Quote Originally Posted by StarBright View Post
    That's a bit odd!

    Did they give you the second appointment time? or do you have to call them again in three months?
    No further appointment given. I am trusting to luck that we will get one. Made a note on my calendar just in case.
    According to the news, senior medics want the 12 weeks for the second one halved. Wait and see what transpires.

    I didn't call them for the initial appointment, it was our doctors who called us offering hubby an appointment and when he was given one I asked about me so we could make just the one journey. As I am in the same group through age they gave me one 4 minutes after his.

    Nukecad, you have a valid point about the sticker. As a note, mine went straight in the bin when we got home.
    Last edited by beau; 23-01-21 at 20:44.

  4. #64
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    671
    Thanks for letting me know. Yes I put a link on this thread earlier about that. So far the top medical people who advise the gov are sticking to three months to get the jab into more people & they "don't think" that extended time will effect the amount of protection it gives people before & after the second jab.

    They have also said that because this jab is the same type of jab as the Oxford one & with that one it was tested up to 12 weeks between doses which gave a higher protection than having the second jab three weeks apart

    Who knows!

  5. #65
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    141
    Jonathan Van Tam has a newspaper article today - fortunately also available subscription free on govt website https://www.gov.uk/government/news/d...nday-telegraph in which he acknowledges the difficulties involved in setting out the vaccination programme. He asks what for me is the unanswerable question - "who on the at risk list should suffer slower access to their first dose so that someone else who has already had one dose (and therefore most of the protection) can get a second?"

    Worth also noting that Scotland, Wales & Northern Ireland received identical advice from the JCVI and identical recommendation from their respective CMOs. All were free to take a different approach - three week gap, six week gap, whatever.

    None of them did.

  6. #66
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    671
    Yes they are all singing from the same hymn sheet that waiting three months between doses is the way to go. But unfortunately it still does not answer the main question.

    Van Tam said: "who on the at risk list should suffer slower access to their first dose so that someone else who has already had one dose (and therefore most of the protection) can get a second?" That's not the question we need answering. Of course most sane people want everyone to get one jab first. That's not the problem.

    The problem is if they give the pfizer jab with a gap of three months instead of three weeks, without any scientific data to say what happens if you leave a three month gap between jabs will it be effective? will it be less or more effective? will the person getting the jab experience any different side effects (don't think they will but who knows) Will it give the same amount of protection for the same length of time as a does of three weeks apart?

    Personally what Van Tam has written is not the question people are asking him he skirted around it on a moral question rather than a medical data question

  7. #67
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    West Cumbria (Lake District)
    Posts
    9,722
    What, a government employee not answering the question that was asked but instead giving a long answer about something else in the hope of confusing the issue.

    How unusual.
    I don't know everything. - But I'm good at searching for, and finding, stuff.

    Migration from ESA to Universal Credit- Click here for information.

  8. #68
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    671
    I know shocking!

    It's because this is nothing more than a educated guess or hunch. We so far are the only country doing this it is either going to be the best thing any country has done or the worst

  9. #69
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    West Cumbria (Lake District)
    Posts
    9,722
    It's certainly a gamble, and one that Pfizer don't want to make any comment about without further testing.

    That would/may normally be part of the optional phase 4 testing, which has not done because of time constraints.

    That phase 4 testing is now happening in the community, and if delaying the second jab goes right then it's a brilliant decision.
    (But it isn't backed by any existing medical evidence, there hasn't been time to test and gather that evidence).

    I can see Pfizers reluctance to make a definite statement on this, if it goes wrong then they will be blamed even though it wasn't their decision/advice to delay the second jab.
    I don't know everything. - But I'm good at searching for, and finding, stuff.

    Migration from ESA to Universal Credit- Click here for information.

  10. #70
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    141
    I think it's PRECISELY the question people should be asking. There are many households in this country where one person will be higher (often significantly so) up the scale for vaccination than another. I also think that in the vast majority of such circumstances most would not deny their partner a first vaccination in order to obtain a second for themselves. Certainly when my time comes I wouldn't want to have a second vaccination it it meant depriving my wife of her first.

    As for the 12-week gap, Pfizer's advice is based on the simple fact that they haven't run trials of that length so there is no evidence one way or the other of effectiveness over that period of time. Chris Whitty has said it's a question of balance of risk. If we wait for evidence of whether a 12-week or six-weeks gap produces no significant weakening of protection then we'll be waiting a couple of months for the answer. A couple of months in which we'd be vaccinating more people twice and fewer once. A couple of months when the virus, still operating at an incredibly high level, will have a far higher pool of older and vulnerable people to attack than would be the case if initial vaccinations weren't being given at the rate they currently are.

    I don't think anyone has claimed there isn't a dilemma involved and certainly Chris Whitty has explicitly said there is. The JCVI came down on the side of vaccinating more people once. That advice was accepted by the four CMOs in the UK and in turn by the four administrations. It's a startling unity of approach and one that in any other circumstances than the pandemic would be unthinkable. A Tory government in England, a Labour one in Wales, an SNP administration in Scotland and a multi-party grouping in Northern Ireland ranging from extreme 'no surrender' unionists to ex-IRA (or maybe not ex) Sinn Fein all saying the same thing. And the vast majority of opposition parties in each jurisdiction in agreement.

    There are no absolute rights or wrongs but the question Van Tam poses is not only legitimate but fundamental and in many, many instances appropriate and personal.

Similar Threads

  1. Wheelchair users and COVID 19
    By Andrew76 in forum Health - help & advice on health issues for disabled people
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-04-20, 08:01
  2. Coronavirus (COVID-19): what to do if you’re already getting benefits
    By nukecad in forum Benefits - help & advice on disability benefits, incapacity benefits, ESA and DLA
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-04-20, 09:44
  3. Modability abd Covid-19
    By nukecad in forum Motoring - help & advice on cars for disabled people, Blue Badge and Motability
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-04-20, 14:21
  4. A Swiss Doctor On Covid-19
    By Sky in forum News and general discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 29-03-20, 13:15
  5. Covid 19, face to face assessments suspended
    By noisynoodle in forum Benefits - help & advice on disability benefits, incapacity benefits, ESA and DLA
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 26-03-20, 11:15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •