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Thread: People with disabilities or disabled people?

  1. #11
    Senior Member ***Force_Majeure_007***'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davewhit View Post
    Thats no different than the person who got no exam results at school because they did not wwork will end up flipping burgers at mac D

    you can only work to a level you are able to manage ........ you could say the person with the learning disability is more disabled than someone in a wheel chair when it comes to work IMO of course
    Someone who 'flips burgers' who got no exam results can still go to night school or college to get exams, they can still work their way up or leave and get a better job, they can still better themselves.

    My husband can't read the computer screens that tell the cooks how many burgers to 'flip' and can't remember a list of commands ie; an order of food.

    When there are no more disability benefits which are supposed to give a disabled person a better standard of life to that which they could achieve for themselves then don't bother going on protests to keep your motability car because you are normal and don't need to be propped up by this wonderful charity. People fought for many years to get support and now no one cares about it.

    People don't understand learning disabilities, if your brain don't work properly then it doesn't work...end of!!! You can't push yourself to do better, you try, but end up feeling very frustrated and useless because your brain can't do it....you end up feeling abused by people trying to push you to do better, but if this is the new model of society then there is a very bleak future in store for those with a learning disability 'PROBLEMS', my husband is a very loving, caring man and I wouldn't be without him.

  2. #12
    Senior Member ***Force_Majeure_007***'s Avatar
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    Oh and you won't mind when there are no more blue parking badges or disabled parking bays then???

  3. #13
    New Member pdtscully's Avatar
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    I have 3 hidden impairments/disabilities...
    1. Inflamatory Bowel Disease
    2. Dyslexia
    3. Stutter
    So I know what it is like for those of us who experience difficulties, whilst those around us assume there is nothing wrong... there are a lot of people, who will look at you, and as they can't see any impairment/disabilities, say you're not disabled... even those who have an impairment/disbaility themselves...

    As part of role as a Union Disability Rep, I meet a lot of disabled people... I'm on a Union Disability Advisory Committee & an executive member of a Departmental Disability Network... and apart from one individual, all our impairments/disabilities are hidden...

    To highlight the issue... I designed the following artwork for a poster... I have used about 30, even though there are 1000's of hidden disabilities...




    And yes, I know that not everyone will like it, or be able to view it... but it still in the draft stage...
    Last edited by pdtscully; 03-09-12 at 18:36.

  4. #14
    Senior Member ***Force_Majeure_007***'s Avatar
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    Hi, pdtscully,

    Thank you, finally someone who understands the gist of where we are coming from!

    My husband has:

    1) Cognitive Impairment
    2) Severe Developmental Dyslexia (complete word blindness)
    3) Dyscalculia (like dyslexia but with numbers)
    4) Dysgraphia (like dyslexia but with drawing and handwriting)
    5) Dyspraxia (coordination problems especially with hand tools, hammer, screwdriver etc.)
    6) Irritable bowel syndrome.

    My husband say that no one understands what it's like to have all these disabilities in 'one head' as he puts it. What he means, as the doctors say is all in 'one brain'.

    He looks normal and can hold a good conversation, as long as it doesn't have for example famous peoples names as he can't remember names as mentioned in one of my earlier posts. If names, addresses etc come up he just says "Yeah" and pretends like he knows who you mean, but actually doesn't have a clue. Telephone banking is a nightmare because he is unable to complete the security questions asked by banks, like what is your address, postcode, what was the last transaction etc; unless I am sitting next to him telling him the answers. On several occasions the banker has heard me give my husband the answers and have terminated the call because he has to answer for himself.

    We fought and won a 3 year court case against our local council to get rehoused in a bungalow, as mentioned earlier I am physically disabled. The council lied through their teeth, but they didn't get in any trouble afterwards, just gave an apolgy, but what about all the stress that they caused.

    Our local adult social care department did not believe that my husband had a learning disability even with all the medical reports from a Professor of Neurology and Neuropsychology. This professor even wrote to Uta Frith who is the lady responsible for translating a book written in German by Dr Hans Asperger in the 70's. She is highly respected in the field of learning disability. He wrote to Uta Frith regarding my husbands case as he is apparently quite unique in his array of disabilities and the impact that they have on him in day to day life.

  5. #15
    Senior Member ***Force_Majeure_007***'s Avatar
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    P.S. I love the poster, it's really cool!!!

  6. #16
    New Member pdtscully's Avatar
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    Although not as severe as your husbands impairments... it took me years to over come my Dyslexia... it was only when I discovered comics when I was about 11-12 years old that I was able to overcome my reading problems... I guess it was the pictures along side the words that helped me...
    But I am unsure how that would help your husband...

    I would avoid Telephone Banking... you would be better of with Internet Banking...

    So can your your husband recognise numbers & letter...?

    With all your husbands Cognitive Impairments (Severe Developmental Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia & Dyspraxia), thats hard enough to cope with... but having IBS on top...

    With regards to your husbands IBS, has he had a full investigation... or just a basic assessment...?

    I only ask, as I have heard of a lot of cases, where people have been labeled as having IBS, because the doctor/s haven't got a clue what patient has...

  7. #17
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    To Force-Majeure 007, I said earlier that alongside having a physical disability myself, I have spent lots of time with people with all kinds of disabilities throughout my life.

    It's very difficult to comment on individual circumstances and people's individual problems without knowing them or knowing more about them hence my comments sticking to only one or two points you raised. I agree it's very difficult for people with hidden disabilities, but in my own personal experience life is equally difficult for those with physical disabilities perhaps in different ways.

    That doesn't mean I do not understand or empathise with you and your husband's situation.

    Rich-ward

  8. #18
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    The OP mentions "invalid carriage". Under current legislation, this term still exists. A manual wheelchair is legally a "class 1 invalid carriage". Mobility Scooters and powered Wheelchairs are either Class 2 or Class 3 invalid carriages. The differences between class 2 and 3 relate to top speed (4 or 8 mph); maximum size and weight; ability to drive on roads (class 3 only); and requirement for a tax disk (class 3).

  9. #19
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Hidden impairments like Dyslexia

    Some years ago I used to chair meetings for disabled staff where I worked. I was surprised as to how many people came forward with hidden impairments - mainly dyslexia.

    I actually attended a course to help me understand the issues that face people with this condition.

    One thing that surprised me was the number of famous people who have learning difficulties. Ruch as Tom Cruise, Richard Branson even a Prime Minister - Winston Churchill. What amazed me was that people could get around ths impairment by picture association. By thinking pictures linked to stories they could remember things eg to remember numbers think off pictures like for number three think of 'tree' . Four/door, five/dive. eight/date.

    In fact a dyslexic person has a more highly developed mind than your average person to make sense of the world.

    I used to work for a dyslexic assistant director - she was hopeless at spelling, writing numbers but this freed her up to have 'vision' seeing the bigger picture without being bogged down by details.

    So strange as it may seem having a hidden disability like dyslexia can give you an advantage given te chance.

    Conversely when a disabled person has a number of different impairments ten I think they should have a choice as to whether they want to work.

  10. #20
    Senior Member ***Force_Majeure_007***'s Avatar
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    To, pdtscully,

    No he is completely word blind......he can't read or write at all, and has been forced many times into adult classes but to no avail, his brain just can't string letters together.

    He was seen at The National Hospital For Neurology and Neurosurgery at Queens Square in London by a leading Professor of Neurology. He attended this hospital for nine months going once a month for a whole day from 9am - 5pm to have cognitive testing and the outcome was that the professor wrote a five page report and diagnosed him as having a severe learning disability; Cognitive Impairments (Severe Developmental Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia & Dyspraxia), He said that with regards to reading and numbers my husband was equivalent to a blind person even though his sight is good. He also said my husbands case is a new unique case because he is able to drive a car, he passed his test around 25-30 years ago and has never had an accident, (which is why the Professor wrote to Uta Frith as mentioned in one of my previous posts.) This Professor worked alongside a Professor Duncan who is one of the Queen Physicians and carried out the hip operation on the Queen Mother. My husband was tested and seen by loads of other Professors who worked under the Professor of Neurology.

    Internet banking is actually impossible for my husband to access, he can't operate a washing machine never mind a computer....

    With regards to IBS our GP has not investigated as to why my husband has loose stools no matter what he eats, but he had another medical problem a few years ago and was put on Tramadol a painkiller, with a side effect of constipation (in a normal person without IBS).
    However, what we found by accident is that these 'painkillers' actually regulate his stool movements, but these may not work for everyone. He takes one, three times a day. Oh yeah, I forgot to mention he was also diagnosed with Diabetes just over a year ago.

    It hurts my husband so much when he can't remember my birthday, our son's birthday or the anniversary of his mother's & father's deaths, he doesn't know days of the week or months.

    When my husband was working on the factory production line (this was before he had the medical report from the National Hospital for Neurology) the non disabled supervisors would take the mickey out of the disabled people but they didn't understand what was being said, but my husband did understand and he got upset over the way they were treating disabled people. The supervisors then said "he's different to the others he understood our little jokes." These 'little jokes' were at the expense of the disabled workers. We know about the disability discrimination act, it was in force then but it's hard to prove when it's your word against their word.

    My husband was and is more self aware than the other disabled people he worked with at the factory, which is another unique aspect his disability as explained to us by the Professor.

    My husband has tried suicide twice over his disabilities and spent 7 days in a psychiatric unit and was diagnosed as not having any mental illness but was mentally disabled and needed support.

    My husband showed his 5 page medical report written by the professor to a lady at our local Mencap day centre, she had never seen anything like it before and she had worked for mencap for 20 years.

    Our government are in some ways trying to eradicate disabilities by integrating disabled children into mainstream schools, then a few years later start saying that schools are getting worse in respect of their achievements in the three R's, well maybe it's not down to the teachers as the politicians keep saying, but rather it's down to how many students they now have with learning disabilities/problems.

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