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Thread: Disabled should be paid less than minimum wage =.

  1. #1
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    Disabled should be paid less than minimum wage =.

    I'm gobsmacked!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-39138775

    The word that comes to mind is Untermensch.
    Last edited by nukecad; 02-03-17 at 22:59.
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    To be far the article doesn't say that disabled people should be paid less. Rosa Monckton is suggesting that, for some people including her own daughter, the benefits of being in work out way the wage they get.

    Whilst she may be right about the benefit I'm not sure it's a road we should go down, as I'm sure some employers will happily adbuse the position.
    No single thing can define me; not my work, not my politics, not my hobbies, not my vices and not my disability. I'm way more complex than that!

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    Senior Member deebee's Avatar
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    I could see where the mother was coming from,but does she not realise what a huge backward step this would be.
    And as Vantage says,employers would take advantage of this

  4. #4
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    There's a lady that works in my local Tesco Extra Cafe. She has Down Syndrome but is part of the team and well known to the regulars that frequent the Cafe as a valued part of the community. She lives at home with her mum and dad, works four days a week and works with a bit of supervision. She cleans the tables, sweeps the floor, tidies the pots up off the tables and helps carry food to tables for customers. She also likes to interact with small talk with customers. Her duties ensure that the cafe looks clean and presentable which entices new custom.

    There is no way that she doesn't earn less than her fellow workers and she never complains! Given the right environment, support and encouragement there's no reason why people with learning difficulties can't thrive while working in mainstream services in my opinion.

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    'untermensch', reminds me of another slogan, which adorned sites near where I used to live and other infamous places, this was 'Arbeit Macht Frei'. Now we are not there now, but the demonization of certain elements of communities, is a negative which appears to be growing.
    That aside there is a vast spectrum, of people with learning disabilities, from what might be termed slight to severe, so where would you draw the line. Who would they lump in the 'pay them less', and how much less, then expand the programme to other disabilities, before you know it, people are then invisible.
    A bit of a rant I know, but having worked in the area of mental health and its impact in the past, I have experienced negative thinking, not only to those in 'care' situations, but also towards myself and others.

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    Senior Member gus607's Avatar
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    Sadly there are many who see benefits as a way of life because they are much better off than working.

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    I thought we were all equal in this country!

    Hello, I was made aware of this story yesterday and have plenty to say on the subject.

    Firstly the family in this particular instance are well heeled, Miss Monckton the mum was described as Diana's confidant, and are not concerned about money to live on "in practice money is not the real point" they have independent means so the young lady in question doesn't need to earn a full wage, most folk aren't as lucky so what disturbs me is

    1. this could become acceptable practice.
    2. It sets a precedent.
    3. How long (not long I suspect) before this idea is stretched to include all disabilities.
    And 4. It's likely to end up with all benefit claimants being forced to work to continue receiving benefits, and ultimately the scrapping of the minimum wage act!

    I think this story was just about having another dig! If this young lady's mum thinks her daughter would benefit from working, what's the point of the article as she's already working for her mothers charity and Miss Moncktons (the mum) article seems to be more concerned about helping out employers by reducing their wage bill! If "in practice money is not the real point" then all employees should be paid the minimum wage, it's there for a reason!

    Mother writes for The Spectator..... Need I say more

    "Some of us are more equal than others"

    Anyway rant finished before I boil over!

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    I have read the full article.

    i took note of all the families included within the article and of their sons and daughters who happen to have a learning disability and their experiences of trying to get a job.

    Of how the minimum wage, creates a barrier to a job for these particular young people, as many of these young people cannot complete the whole range of duties attributed to an advertised job. Ms Monckton described how her daughter believed £5.00 would be enough for a trip to New York.

    With protections enshrined in law, in place, as we have for positive discrimination, I would like to think jobs can be found for those with a learning disability, which is what many of the young people desperately want.

  9. #9
    Senior Member CrippledLassie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lighttouch View Post
    There's a lady that works in my local Tesco Extra Cafe. She has Down Syndrome but is part of the team and well known to the regulars that frequent the Cafe as a valued part of the community. She lives at home with her mum and dad, works four days a week and works with a bit of supervision. She cleans the tables, sweeps the floor, tidies the pots up off the tables and helps carry food to tables for customers. She also likes to interact with small talk with customers. Her duties ensure that the cafe looks clean and presentable which entices new custom.

    There is no way that she doesn't earn less than her fellow workers and she never complains! Given the right environment, support and encouragement there's no reason why people with learning difficulties can't thrive while working in mainstream services in my opinion.
    Absolutely agree with everything here. What does it say about our society if we treat people with disabilities like second class citizens. The shear determination and effort that some people have to go through just to get up in the morning and get to work is enough to put able bodied people to shame. Everyone deserves dignity and respect, this includes equal pay and recognition.
    Just call me Rasy

  10. #10
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    It's very disturbing,

    Yes at the moment you could say it's just this one womans misguided view.

    But it's being reported on mainstream TV, on the BBC no less.
    I first spotted it last night on the 'Main Headlines' section of teletext. As I was reading, it was taken down from there.

    I am worried that it is the first shot in a new propaganda campaign.

    You know that for a number of years they have been touting the "Work is good for you, Work can cure you" line.
    As mzmps rightly says this is getting uncomfotably close to 'Arbeit Macht Frei'

    Is this their next stage - force you to work for under min wage? (Whilst also giving their business mates cheap labour).

    How long before we hear of special residential homes from which the disabled (and immigrants) can 'looked after' and be productive and work for their living expenses?
    They won't call them the Workhouse, but if it looks like a duck and quacks then...
    (Let's bring back 'Victorian Values' - now who said that?)


    Some may think that I am overreacting using a word like untermensch, but this is not the only idea or even policy being touted by our current government that are strangely reminiscent of 1930s/40s Germany.
    I have pointed this out (ranted) previously with regard to our latest anti-terrorism laws which are a virtual mirror of the 'The Reichstag Fire Decree' updated to modern times. http://www.youreable.com/forums/show...ll=1#post85713


    PS.
    If you are happy to work for less than min wage then you can - it's called volunteering and plenty of places would be delighted to see you.
    Last edited by nukecad; 03-03-17 at 16:57.
    I don't know everything. - But I'm good at searching for, and finding, stuff.

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