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Thread: Son with ASD Blue Badge application

  1. #1
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    Question Son with ASD Blue Badge application

    Hi everyone,

    I live in Lincoln and my son has been diagnosed with Autism (ASD). I have recently applied for a blue badge on his behalf (he is 3).

    Has anyone gone through this process in a similar situation?

    My application is in already and im just awaiting a response.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Do you receive the enhanced mobility or higher rate of Dla if so you'll receive it most likely, and if you receive the lower rates of both you'll probably be accepted

  3. #3
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    Just being curious, but what 'eligibility criteria' statements did you use for your claim?

    Also, did you send in a detailed letter with the application to substantiate your claim; such as featured in here: https://autisticson.wordpress.com/20...15/blue-badge/

    If your application is rejected, maybe re-apply with more appropriate evidence.

  4. #4
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    I currently dont recieve any mobility DLA for my son as I have not yet applied for it. I need more evidence from peadiatrician etc. I do recieve middle rate care on his behalf and this is likely to be increased to high rate in the near future. I intend to apply for high rate mobility under the "severe mental impairment" criteria eventually.

    As for the blue badge this is what I sent them.

    Christopher Is virtually unable to walk. Christopher's issues stem directly from his Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). ASD is a physical disability because it is an arrested state of brain development and therefore should be classed as such.
    Christopher is unable to walk 20 metres without interruptions, distractions and/or incident due to the rigidity of thought that is a symptom of ASD. Christopher will encounter temporary paralysis (refusal to walk) during any attempt to take him somewhere outside of his normal routine. This is a paralysis of will that cannot be remedied by offer of reward or threat of punishment. It is not a conscious choice that Christopher makes but rather an effect of his rigidity of thought brought about by Autism.
    Christopher will often and randomly go into an “autistic meltdown” without notice. This is usually due to a sensory overload which is another symptom of ASD. He will lie on the ground kicking and screaming without any regard to safety of himself or others. He will kick and punch out at anything passing by, whether a person or object. The only solution is to intervene and physically restrain him to prevent him causing physical injury to himself or another, or damage to property.
    We currently limit our outdoor movements with Christopher to a minimum which is having a detrimental effect on his general life and social skills. Christopher’s autistic traits are so unpredictable that he requires another person to be present and watching over him whenever he is awake.
    Other ASD causes which directly affect Christopher's walking are his inability to distinguish danger of any sort; his clumsiness; poor balance; lack of coordination; his anxiety and fearfulness of the outdoor environment and the unknown.
    The ASD is compounded by Christopher’s Hyper Mobility. He cannot walk great distances as his joints get sore from his condition. Although Christopher cannot communicate verbally it is obvious he gets pain and stiffness in the joints and muscles – particularly towards the end of the day and after physical activity.
    Christopher has been given an inhaler recently by his GP. The GP thought Christopher showed signs of asthma when he has cold like symptoms. During these occurrences, Christopher’s ability to walk is further reduced.


    I also wrote a statment saying how helpful the blue badge would be etc.
    Last edited by mchlpeel; 19-02-17 at 20:42.

  5. #5
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    I personally think you'll receive a blue badge givin what you've wrote, perhaps ask his GP for a letter that would seal the deal

    Best of luck with it all

  6. #6
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    May be a lottle previous for a blue badge for a three year old as surely he could go in a buggy or be carried, I would think it would need to be an extreme physical disability which would warrant one for a child as young as three.

  7. #7
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    Your letter provides a very well presented case, but without meeting the eligibility criteria, my opinion is that your application will be rejected.

  8. #8
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    Don't worry if your BB application fails because what you've written should warrant an award of DLA High Mobility which in turn will qualify your son for a BB.

    I remember a neighbours Downs Syndrome (arrested brain development from birth) child being awarded DLA high mobility even though he had no walking issues.

    Problem was - he'd often go on strike, sit down and refuse to budge outside a Supermarket - and that's what earned him the DLA High Mobility award.

    Good luck to Christopher

  9. #9
    brightonbelle
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    blue badge criteria for children aged 3 and over is as follows................

    automatic entitlement if receiving a qualifying benefit etc

    If not in receipt of said benefit, then it as the discretion of the local authority based on the criteria of the child unable to walk, or have severe difficulty in walking. Discretionary awards will require supporting medical evidence, and may or may not require a mobility assessment arranged by the local authority.


    Children under 3 are expected to be using a buggy etc. But they may still be eligible for a badge. For example, if heavy/bulky equipment is needed to stay with them ie oxygen tank, or if they have equipment stored in the vehicle that they may need to access in an emergency, ie suction equipment, oxygen nebuliser etc.

    hth
    Last edited by brightonbelle; 20-02-17 at 14:25.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by brightonbelle View Post
    blue badge criteria for children aged 3 and over is as follows................ If not in receipt of said benefit, then it as the discretion of the local authority based on the criteria of the child unable to walk, or have severe difficulty in walking. Discretionary awards will require supporting medical evidence, and may or may not require a mobility assessment arranged by the local authority.
    Out of interest, where have you had this information from?

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