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Thread: Top Shelf Material....No not that!

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
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    219

    Top Shelf Material....No not that!

    As a wheelchair user to be able to get around reliably, as I cannot walk very far each day. When it comes to going to the supermarket/shops, my wheelchair has to be used, to get around, how do other members find it.

    Most of the time, I'm out with family or friends who are around me, so negotiating around isn't too bad, but as the title suggests getting things off of higher shelves is difficult. The staff in the local Asda I use, are used to seeing me and there's usually someone there to help, without much trouble, how do others find getting help.

    While in the shops, how do you find negotiating narrow aisles, pallets strewn everywhere, grumpy or ignorant people around you. Of course this does not apply to only those of us in wheelchairs, but sticks, crutches or those who just struggle getting out and about.

    Funny or serious responses welcome:
    Mine, on one occasion whilst still able to get around on foot in Asda again, looking at the healthy food for once, was rammed from behind by another trolley, ending up looking at the bottom of my trolley approaching quickly. The response when regained composure and gave my usual gruff "excuse me", was shrug of shoulders and a back turned to me.

  2. #2
    Biscuitgazer
    Guest
    On the pavement in my wheelchair, you know those little children's trolleys with a flag at eye level, I want one of those flags for my wheelchair, or maybe one for each corner of it. That would help people to see me. I find that most walking folks are very apologetic if they bump me, but I've noticed that they just don't see my wheelchair out of the corner of their eye, so even if they're just standing there they are surprised at my "sudden" appearance.

    There are always the other sort of people, not many, fortunately, like the group of four boys who walk straight on even though they can see me approaching right on front of them with nowhere to go - I wonder what would happen if I didn't stop for them.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    People reading their phones and not looking where they are going - are not welcome to sit on my lap. It is reserved for cats and small children only.

    Or walking backwards from the cash point - argh!! I need a louder horn and a pointy stick (that opens doors for me too).

  4. #4
    I'm not a wheelchair user but I do have arthritis in my hands which means I can be slow at the cash points if I'm unloading on my own. What annoys me are the customers who can't wait and start piling their goods onto the conveyor belt before I've even finished and before I've even put the bar across to separate my shopping from theirs.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Oct 2016
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    Not had that problem myself, well not yet, staff and other shoppers have been very helpful. Load shopping into basket I rest on my lap, even taking shopping to car for me. The self-service tills when used a different matter, those with conveyor means back and forth, with annoying and painful protrusions just at the wrong places, those with just a shelf, do not have enough room. My hands are not the best either, so juggling things not an option unless you want stuff all over the floor that is.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Mar 2011
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    Manchester
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    3,800
    The best supermarket for a wheelchair user to use is Sainsburys.

    Just wheel up to customer service and ask for an 'assisted shop'. They'll send a friendly staff member pushing a trolley for you. Have a shopping list to hand and get them to reach up high, pick fruit and choose frozen stuff high up. They'll unload, till up, repack and take your stuff and load up your car - all with a big smile!

    Let us know how you get on.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Oct 2016
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    Didn't know that about Sainsburys, cheers Lighttouch.

    There is not one in my town, but in next town across so might be worth giving it a go. Parents and friends help me out as well, but it's always good to have back up plan and a change is good sometimes, when up to it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2014
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    England
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    Hello mzmps

    I have had assisted shopping at Asda, but I do try to avoid going at the busiest times.

    I know Waitrose will help too as a young family member is often requested by older persons as their preferred choice of assisted shopper as she's happy to chat as they do the shopping together.

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