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Thread: 8 mph Mobility Scooters and Epilepsy

  1. #11
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    I would have thought that the insurance would be another problem here.

    If the epilepsy is recent and has not been declared to the insurers then it will be invalid and will not pay out any claims.

    So even though they are paying premiums they may not be insured.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
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    Will this also apply to mobility scooter insurance, I know it would with car insurance.

  3. #13
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    Of course the insurance company will apply this to scooters.
    Unless you have declared it as one of your conditions (and no doubt pay extra).

    Insurers will use any excuse to avoid paying out.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
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    Thank you Nukecad, I will be having a few words, politely of course, the next time I see them. Mind you I think it will fall on deaf ears.
    This person relies on the scooter to be able to get out but I am of the opinion that because of the fits they shouldn't be on the road or even on the pavement, or am I just being mean?
    To me safety is a priority.

  5. #15
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    I would agree with that. If they could use this to void a claim they would no sweat. I also agree they would want more money if it was declared and would pass the buck to the GP as far as driving on the road. That makes sense to me.

  6. #16
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    Beau, no, you are not being mean.......imagine the consequences of say that out of control scooter knocking a pushchair/baby buggy into the path of traffic..........Might never happen, but is it worth chancing that?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nukecad View Post
    Of course the insurance company will apply this to scooters.
    Unless you have declared it as one of your conditions (and no doubt pay extra).

    Insurers will use any excuse to avoid paying out.
    Car ins by law they can not load the premium if DVLA are aware of the condition. Obviously if you haven't told DVLA of a notifiable condition then your ins non valid as is your driving licence. No idea regarding mobility scooters though.

  8. #18
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    This is something I do know about being epileptic. I use a powered chair as you know LT and no problem cuz IF i did have a fit (unlikely) the hand falls off the joystick and I fall on the floor - full stop.
    I believe the problem would be taking a scooter on the ROAD. I have had scooter firms phone me up and when they heard i had history of epilepsy.....they couldn't run fast enough!! Didn't want to touch me with a barge pole.
    The GP is not always a help. Shopmobility required a letter from the GP - who said Well i can't SEE the machine so how can I say you're safe to drive. Not until I got a letter from the hospital saying I'd been fit free for 3 years could I get throught to them!

  9. #19
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    The statutory requirements for notification are in here:-

    https://www.gov.uk/browse/driving/hi...de-road-safety {Legal obligations of drivers and riders}

    https://www.gov.uk/legal-obligations-drivers-riders {You must tell DVLA if you:.... have or develop a medical condition}

    https://www.gov.uk/driving-medical-conditions {1. Telling DVLA about a medical condition or disability....}


    "You could be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a condition that might affect your ability to drive safely. You could also be prosecuted if you have an accident."


    Hope this helps.

  10. #20
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
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    Thank you for that. This person has had to surrender their driving licence due to the fits. I do wonder if having a 8 mph scooter on the road is safe. To me it is the same as driving even though it is a much slower form of transport.

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