Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Adaptations grant- criteria + powered wheelchair disaster

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    112

    Adaptations grant- criteria + powered wheelchair disaster

    Hi all

    I have had an OT round today to assess for a powered wheelchair and adaptations for a downstairs loo.

    I'm really upset as to how it's gone and was wondering if anyone had any advice?

    The simple one first - adaptations are means tested. I work full time and so does my husband. We have a little bit of savings left from the last time I was wrongfully dismissed (9 months ago). Does anyone know what the threshold is for getting any financial help towards the work? In terms of savings and earnings. I just want to know if I should even bother asking the questions as I feel so let down by the other half of the visit, which was the wheelchair.

    I became disabled 4 years ago and my mobility has declined quite rapidly and then tailed off to consistent crap. I get the higher rate of PIP mobility.

    I don't have a ramp for my home and do not currently use a wheelchair at all. I cannot self propel due to dislocations in my shoulders and poor grip strength/dislocated fingers.

    I've been told I don't qualify for an electric wheelchair because I don't have a ramp and because I can walk inside my home. The wheelchair has to be for use inside and outside, in that if I don't need one for in my home, then I don't qualify. I work in a large office and literally drop with exhaustion every evening, I cannot cope any longer with the moving around I'm having to do. Equally, I don't eat or drink enough in the daytime to prevent me from having to go to the toilet, so that I can stay at my desk longer and not move. My work are consolidating 5 buildings and moving in to one massive building soon and I know I will not be able to get around when this happens.

    I don't know what to do now. I can't accept this is the way it is but don't know where to go next to get the help I need. Or am I supposed to pay for it myself? I've lost 4 jobs in the 4 years I have been disabled and am on a stage 2 medical capability plan, which will enable them to dismiss me if I am medically incapable of doing the job. It is up to me to get my own wheelchair provison. I was told I would be given a manual wheelchair today if I wanted one that someone else would push.

    I'm going to shut up before I rant about not being given the help I need to stay in work!!! Can anyone help with info or advice?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    441
    Hi Kaff I understand exactly how you feel, it's very frustrating and not as easy as they make it sound.

    I can't answer all your questions, but I can tell you what I do know.

    Disabled facilities grant: they will look at any savings you have over £6K. My understanding is that the amount of grant money you get will be reduced by your savings over £6K but I don't know how much by, or what the upper limit is. But it is certainly worth finding out.

    Power wheelchairs: sadly I think it is standard practice to only issue NHS power chairs to people who can use them indoors and outdoors, is with ramp, etc to get out. You also have to need to use it indoors. Wheelchair budgets have been cut and cut, I've been in exactly the situation you describe.

    Access to Work should be able to help, but if I'm honest I can see problems here too. They will need 3 quotes for a wheelchair: this takes time. Funding (if your employer is over a certain size) is dependent on a contribution from your employer and AtW pay the rest. I would certainly recommend you speak to them ASAP and see what they suggest. You will be eligible for help, I'm just concerned about the timing of your situation.

    (this might not help, ignore if it doesn't, but I had a period of using a small indoor/outdoor scooter indoors at my workplace to get from one area to another. Not a perfect plan by any means, and I now use a power wheelchair at work, but it did the job and kept me there while things were sorted. I mention this because it is by far the cheapest battery powered wheels if you are considering buying something yourself. You shouldn't have to, of course.)

    See if there is a local Centre for Independent Living in your area, they should be able to give you good info and some support.

    Best of luck, I know it's tough.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    112
    Thanks very much for your advice. It does look likely that I will need wheels to get me around at work in the mean time. I will try access to work too, although my employer will be told to pay for all of it. Not sure where that leaves me, as my last job got rid of me after an access to work application. I just want to keep my job!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    3,800
    Disabled Facilities Grant for downstairs loo and electric wheelchair.

    I no longer work as I took early retirement. I get a small private pension, no state pension, no ESA or using Benefit and I live in a bungalow4. I was assessed as needing an electric wheelchair. I wanted an indoor/outdoor electric wheelchair - they said they could only supply an indoor electric wheelchair as I don’t have an external ramp.


    They said if we install a new ramp I would also need a new downstairs bathroom! I live in a bungalow with an existing bathroom I’m happy with but no it would need to be gutted. Only once you have a ramp installed can you have an indoor/outdoor wheelchair.


    Due to my savings I wasn’t eligible for a grant.


    I asked if I could pay for and install a metal fully fabricated, professionally made ramp with grab rails. If I did I still wouldn’t be eligible as the ramp needs to be made of concrete!


    I gave up going down that line. In the end I bought a manual lightweight manual wheelchair that was tailored to my size and bought an add-on motor that turned it into a powered wheelchair but stylish! The add-on motor cost £4,000. The custom made wheelchair with custom wheels, a JAY cushion cost over £3,000. Then you have insurance, breakdown recovery and maintenance costs. You’re nearer to £8,000 and I paid an extra £1.300 for a car hoist!


    Being disabled can be an expensive business when you fund it yourself.


    Access to work is your best option. Offer to put a few hundred pounds towards it. I would suggesti you also look into electric wheelchairs as they have tighter turning circles. Have an idea as to what you want before talking with an assessor. Your manager will say he has no funding to subsidise the wheelchair or scooter.


    The top up that your works put towards your scooter or wheelchair should come out of a corporate general budget not your bosses office budget.


    If you want anything more just ask.

  5. #5
    Senior Member catlover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    674
    Just to re-iterate what Fliss has said. I am in a similar position and have recently had an Access to work assessment and raised the issue of getting a wheelchair through AtW (it wasn't the main reason for the assessment). It is complicated to get a chair through AtW but not impossible. If you would use the chair for anything other than getting around at work you would be expected to contribute towards the cost as it would be assumed that you are getting some personal use from it. The 3 quotes thing is difficult too as AtW require 3 quotes but wheelchair suppliers will not give a quote without doing an assessment. I have, however, been recommended to be assessed for which chair would suit me. I do recommend approaching AtW to start the ball rolling but realise it may be a lengthy process and you may be expected to contribute, especially if you intend to use the chair outside of the workplace (eg to get from car to place of work).

    An alternative, as Fliss suggests, is to consider buying. I have a boot scooter that I use daily as a wheelchair and I use that to get around the office. I simply couldn't get around without it and certainly couldn't get from car to my office without it. It is "parked up" a couple of metres from my desk so I can access it easily when I need to get up and go somewhere. It cost about £500. A slightly more expensive option is to buy a small power chair like this

    http://www.betterlifehealthcare.com/...werchair/9056/

    I am considering buying something like that as an alternative to using the scooter where easy manoeuvrability in small spaces is needed. It's a pain to have to pay out for your own but if you can afford it at least you can get something that's probably better looking than NHS would provide

  6. #6
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,989
    I have spent thousands on adaptations for me. Doesn't pay to have saved and planned for your future.
    Last edited by beau; 24-05-16 at 10:52.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    3,800
    Quote Originally Posted by beau View Post
    I have spent thousands on adaptations for me. Doesn't pay to have saved and planned for you future.
    So true Beau, best to spend your money having fun. When they do a financial assessment they want to see the last four months bank statements to see if you've had a massive spending spree.

  8. #8
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,989
    Why do you think I pay an arm and a leg for travel insurance. I love travelling to foreign parts and enjoying other cultures. Just got back from my latest foray and looking for the next.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    1,484
    I have encountered this from OT as well. The ruling is you have to use the wheelchair inside and out. In the end the landlord did some internal work, lowering my front step to 4 inches and I brought a ramp to enable me to WHEEL it in, as opposed to drag/lifting it those inches! This may not be your answer https://www.esedirect.co.uk/p-3486-t...erb-ramps.aspx
    Do some research as many "disabled ramps" can be costly, metal and it depends whether you need to "wheel" in and whether its permanent or temp.
    Where wheelchair is concerned: try turn2us.org.uk They have lists of charities that give grants. You WILL be expected to contribute yourself.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    112
    Thanks everyone for your advice. I'm sorry others have experienced similar, and I feel a bit better about just stopping that route. It felt childish to just dismiss it, but now looks like the right thing to do. Life's tough enough without putting myself through all that with no realistic outcome.

    I broached the subject at work and my boss suggested that if I need a wheelchair indoors for moving around the office, then maybe this is not the right job. He thinks a reasonable adjustment would be for me to do a different job. Argh!

Similar Threads

  1. New Powered wheelchair
    By sea queen in forum News and general discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-11-15, 19:03
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 17-10-14, 14:29
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-07-14, 16:19
  4. Jet Powered Wheelchair
    By Ransman in forum Motoring - help & advice on cars for disabled people, Blue Badge and Motability
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-09-13, 08:23
  5. powered wheelchair into car.
    By tonyhag in forum Ask a question about equipment
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-01-13, 18:29

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •