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Thread: first wheelchair

  1. #11
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    Ouch- if it's a helium with the wheels then that would be £3000 which is totally inaffordable for me - even if I just went with the Life R without with just the basics I'm looking at over £850!

    It's so frustrating that just to be able to move is so expensive!
    Last edited by helatruralhome; 23-04-16 at 14:04.

  2. #12
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    Another funding choice would be a charitable grant. If applicable it may be worth considering it as well as ATW funding.

    It is expensive I know.
    No single thing can define me; not my work, not my politics, not my hobbies, not my vices and not my disability. I'm way more complex than that!

  3. #13
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    Is is standard that they insist on you funding that amount or is there lee-way? I am confused as the grant specifies they will fund up to around £40k but surely they wouldn't expect someone to contribute such a large percentage (for me it would be 3/7ths)? The amount I'd like them to fund is £6.5k which isn't masses when you look at other potential costs...

  4. #14
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    It's stated as such in the documentation. Whether there is any room for negotiation then I'm not sure, certainly worth trying.

    I was asked specifically whether I could fund the 2/7ths as it would be a requirement in submitting the application, and in my case so would the employer contribution.

    The cap includes support worker funding, which is covered in full. It is aids, equipment and adaptations which have an element of cost share.

    I've copied this from the fact sheet below:

    674. A social and domestic contribution is taken into account. This is based on the number of days the customer works regardless as to whether the wheelchair is used on a non working day. Cost share is applied where appropriate.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...taff-guide.pdf
    Last edited by vantage; 23-04-16 at 15:32.
    No single thing can define me; not my work, not my politics, not my hobbies, not my vices and not my disability. I'm way more complex than that!

  5. #15
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    thanks for that- it's really helpful I'm going to look at grants as well I think just to be on the safe side. I am willing to contribute but only working part-time means my income is some what limited. Really hope I get an award which will help as even getting a better chair will make a massive difference to me. I tested out a Xenon and a Neon today and I was totally amazed at how easy they were to use- I could even go up a disabled ramp on my own (yes it was a very flat one but there would have been no chance with my current chair!)

  6. #16
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    Unhappy

    Well just to update you my first contact with AtW didn't go well- they basically said that as my work have folding wheelchairs (really basic fleet ones) for local authority customers they should just get one of my colleagues to wheel me in from the carpark with one of those and to the toilet if necessary- I burst into tears I felt so belittled

  7. #17
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    I've never heard anything so ridiculous! They are treating you like a bag of spuds. Put them in the wheelbarrow and w4heel them in.

    You should tell them that as a person you wanted to be treated with dignity and be independent. This is the new way AtW approaches access issues. It's a tactic to try and get you to accept the most cost-efficient solution from their point of vie.

    As Vantage said - you need to put forward a 'business case' as to why their solution isn't satisfactory.

    Here are a few ideas . . .
    - it's your right to be able to transport yourself from the car to your place of work
    - it's not practical to expect other staff to ferry you around
    - you want to retain dignity and respect from your work colleagues - if they had to help you each time you feel that they would treat you differently
    - a lightweight wheelchair that you could manage would boost your confidence
    - a lightweight wheelchair that you could manage would make you more time-efficient as you wouldn't be wasting time waiting for assistance.
    - there's a diversity issue. Members of the public might see you as a good disabled role model who can independently get around
    - from a Public relations point of view it could be seen that the Local Authority you work for values disabled staff and encourages them to find solutions to break down disabling barriers in the workplace.

    Think in terms of 'benefits' to the organisation - that's how you persuade them to change their mind.
    Last edited by Lighttouch; 25-04-16 at 16:47.

  8. #18
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    I was devastated when she said that- ask a token gesture she said that they could do a desk assessment to get me an ergonomic keyboard! She said I have to go to NHS wheelchair services first too and get confirmation in writing from them that they aren't willing to help me. I said to her that it was incredibly hard to ask for help and admit I need to use a wheelchair and all she said was 'AtW are only required to provide the minimum needed to keep you in work'. I just felt that my mobility needs were totally trivialised- I was so shocked by how the telephone interview went that I forgot to mention that a colleague wheeling me around wouldn't work anyway as I am a lone worker for the last hour of my shift anyway. In any case- I am independent I just need a wheelchair to continue to be so.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    OK. It seems that they want you to have an assessment through your local council's 'Wheelchair Service' You can self-refer and an assessment can be made at home or in the office.

    The NHS have 1 or 2 suppliers of wheelchairs applied bu 'Invacare' in England. They are big, heavy and clunky - that is all they will offer.

    Alternatively you can ask for a wheelchair voucher but this usually amounts to £200/£400. The downside to owning your own is

    - you pay for the initial outlay
    - you pay for maintenance
    - you pay for insurance
    - if your wheelchair breaks down you'll have to fund a temporary replacement

    As w4e have to play be their rules arrange an assessment and let's see what they say.

  10. #20
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    Sorry to hear your first contact didn't go well. Don't give up however.

    In terms of a business case here are a few ideas for sections
    1. Outline your own personal details, including medical condition etc
    2. Outline your employment details, including hours worked, tenure, company name etc
    3. Outline your job profile, what are your responsibilities, tasks, etc. Do you visit other locations etc?
    4. Give some background as to the application, why are you submitting it, what problems are you trying to address
    5. Detail the application, what you need and why you need it. You need to justify what you want.

    It's not far or reasonable for a colleague to push you around. They have their own responsibilities. I'm assuming the folding wheelchairs are for customers/clients, put this out. I guess they aren't always available? The alternative to ATW funding a wheelchair is for them to supply a support worker. At around £21 per hour this will work out more expensive in the long term.

    In your justification it worth making reference to such things as:
    - keeping you productive in the workplace
    - maintaining you own independence in the workplace
    - psycho-social benefits of independence, going to the toilet alone and not requiring/waiting for help etc
    - alternatives being more costly in the long term

    Having a NHS wheelchair assessment will add a lot of weight to the application. I'd recommend it. Additionally an ATW workplace assessment is not a bad thing. There may be other things that would be improved.

    Hope that's helpful.
    No single thing can define me; not my work, not my politics, not my hobbies, not my vices and not my disability. I'm way more complex than that!

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