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Thread: Bedroom tax and single pensioners?

  1. #11
    Senior Member sea queen's Avatar
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    My friend is disabled and has a care agency going in up to four times daily. She is in a two bedroomed bungalow the second bedroom is incase she needs overnight care. A two bedroomed bungalow was asked for on the initial application form because of this and was granted by the local authority. She is wondering if they will make her move and very worried.
    Sea Queen

  2. #12
    Senior Member Stepheninleeds's Avatar
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    It is complicated. We are told disabled people are an exception, but I am still worried about it as we know they will set conditions down, & we will have to meet them. This could mean the spare come fine for Housing Benefit will have to be paid, even though we are also suppose to be except. Also it could mean we have to show the spare room is used on a regular basis, & how that is defined may be tight. Can they force anyone to move? Yes they can actually. We have a tenancy agreement, but they can change the terms anytime they wish, we cannot. It could mean legal fights.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stepheninleeds View Post
    We have a tenancy agreement, but they can change the terms anytime they wish, we cannot. It could mean legal fights.
    If you have a social housing standard tenancy agreement. They cannot change the terms of your tenancy agreement without your consent. That is set in housing law. However, if you have to contribute towards your rent and fail to do so, you can be evicted for rent arrears.

    Private tenancy aqreements are another ball game.


    If an amendment is made, it would mean disabled people, war widows or widowers, foster carers and those not subject to work-related requirements would not have to pay the penalty until they have been offered suitable accommodation and refused it.
    Last edited by Jen66; 26-02-12 at 12:19.

  4. #14
    davewhit
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stepheninleeds View Post
    It is complicated. We are told disabled people are an exception, but I am still worried about it as we know they will set conditions down, & we will have to meet them. This could mean the spare come fine for Housing Benefit will have to be paid, even though we are also suppose to be except. Also it could mean we have to show the spare room is used on a regular basis, & how that is defined may be tight. Can they force anyone to move? Yes they can actually. We have a tenancy agreement, but they can change the terms anytime they wish, we cannot. It could mean legal fights.
    Imo they will look at the disability and care planes that have been in use for some time, to claim the need will not be enough nor make the claim just as they bill you

    someone asked on one forum can i have it as a gym to get fitter

  5. #15
    Senior Member Stepheninleeds's Avatar
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    The government are changing the housing law right now. Rights are been taken away.
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    Stephen

  6. #16
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Right, let's get something straight. First of all Councils and RSLs have few fully accessible homes on their books. If you have lived in social housing and due to your disability had to have adaptations done to your home such as a ramp, downstairs toilet, through lift or stair-lift then they aren't going to kick you out,

    There is a problem with social housing as there's a miss-match between what people live in and what people need.

    There are a lot of older people living on their own in three bedroom houses and conversely family groups that have outgrown the size of property.

    I think that RSLs are happy for disabled people over 50 to trade down to sheltered accommodation with warden assistance if needed. In some ways it makes sense as you still retain your independence but can get help if needed.

    There's often incentives given to people to trade down in the form of cash - it depends if a scheme is running in your area.

  7. #17
    davewhit
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lighttouch View Post
    Right, let's get something straight. First of all Councils and RSLs have few fully accessible homes on their books. If you have lived in social housing and due to your disability had to have adaptations done to your home such as a ramp, downstairs toilet, through lift or stair-lift then they aren't going to kick you out,

    There is a problem with social housing as there's a miss-match between what people live in and what people need.

    There are a lot of older people living on their own in three bedroom houses and conversely family groups that have outgrown the size of property.

    I think that RSLs are happy for disabled people over 50 to trade down to sheltered accommodation with warden assistance if needed. In some ways it makes sense as you still retain your independence but can get help if needed.

    There's often incentives given to people to trade down in the form of cash - it depends if a scheme is running in your area.
    what you say is true in theory but I know of someone left properties three rental proerties his dad owned all had been in the last 4 years with grants altered with wider doors higher plugs and walk in wet rooms then rented via a housing ass to local disabled people in wheel chairs within 4 weeks of the will being read he had given notice he wanted the houses back ..... and within 6 months the people where out .... he even got an award to help change back the proerties and put normal bathrooms in to help selling them.

    only one of the three people being re housed was able to get a property with doors plugs and bath rooms altered the others where given properties that need work.

    the area the houses where in made it inpossible for them to be bought off my friend and the people would be moved to an area where proerty was cheaper ( live in southeast)

  8. #18
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    If a private landlord owns properties and rents them out to RSLs I guess he's within his rights to buy and sell when he wishes. The new owners obviously had no morals and were purely seeing things in terms of profit.

    Only social landlords will act responsibly.

  9. #19
    davewhit
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lighttouch View Post
    If a private landlord owns properties and rents them out to RSLs I guess he's within his rights to buy and sell when he wishes. The new owners obviously had no morals and were purely seeing things in terms of profit.

    Only social landlords will act responsibly.
    its not a matter of morals property left to him by his dad dieing ....... he had no wish to be a land lord ..... the proerty was rented out via a social land lord as agent too who would not even try and buy property at a fair price they happier to buy cheap property in run down areas cheap spend a few bob on it and move people into not a nice area regardless

    not sure who has the worse morals

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stepheninleeds View Post
    The government are changing the housing law right now. Rights are been taken away.
    Yes, but they cannot make a retrospective change to your tenancy agreement. Even when the change from ten year tenures and life leases to shorthold leases (during the 70's and 80's) occured, the law was not retrospective. Those tenants who hold private tenancys from the 70's still have the rights of housing law from that period

    All new tenants will have to follow the new tenancy agreements, but those social housing tenancy agreements already in place will remain. i.e You cannot be evicted unless you fail to pay your rent or break you tenancy agreement. Hence why bringing in the bedroom tax will cause some in hardship to fall behind in their rent payments and be subject to eviction under non-payment. But providing your rent is paid under your current tenancy agreement, you cannot be evicted for being under-occupied.

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