Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Regrettable purchases or How long is a piece of string?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Greater London
    Posts
    335

    Regrettable purchases or How long is a piece of string?

    Hello,

    I was just wondering if other members may have bought a rollator and later regretted not purchasing a mobility scooter instead?

    The reason I ask is purely A financial one, as buying a rollator now could be a terrible waste of money in the long run as my condition COULD (not willl) deteriorate further in the near future

    A thought occurred to me it could be a case that the running cost of a reasonably priced scooter over two years or so could end up costing more then a top of the range imported rollator!

    Any advice or thoughts on this topic would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    1,484
    Both or either can be brought fairly reasonably 2nd hand. to give you an idea...i have just been GIVEN a scooter, paid @ £150 for new batteries and a service and new charger. now have to wait for a better entrance to enable me to get in/out the house!
    So: thing to consider;
    where will i store it?
    can I walk at all? (for the rollator)
    can I go on buses and trains? (not so much with the scooter)
    the running cost of a scooter is not bad - its the initial outlay.
    Try preloved, or look locally for 2nd hand one first.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    3,800
    Your Social Services could have supplied a rollator for free as it would be considered a minor adaptation.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Greater London
    Posts
    335
    Hi,

    I did discuss the rollator issue with an occupational therapist and a physiotherapist but, here's the but, a rollator will do nothing for my speed of walking or my fatigue, and I would therefor need a seat on it, however the standard seats won't be suitable for me, and I would have to buy my own.

    I've thought about a mobility scooter and done some research on them, an have definitely ruled out a road scooter, as I would need one I can take on the local buses
    I have a lockable shed for storage of a pavement scooter. But I'm still confused about the costs of keeping one charged, I'll also need to consult a specialist as most of our local pavements are badly damaged by tree roots and I'm worried that they would effect the stability of any unit I might buy.

    And yes I can still walk a short distance but verrrrry sloooowly and not very far before I need to stop. (Which is why I've been awarded the standard rate mobility of PIP)

    I just wondered if someone had bought something and later regretted it and if so might running costs have been the reason?

  5. #5
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,973
    The cost of keeping a scooter charged is not a great deal and the freedom one gives you far outweighs the cost.
    As for uneven pavements, a wide wheel span along with one that has large wheels will give more stability. I find that to travel slowly and carefully over uneven pavements is the safest way.

    I have a small boot scooter too and no way is it safe to travel over uneven pavements but it is fine for supermarkets and shopping malls.

  6. #6
    Senior Member catlover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    674
    I don't think it's a case of which is the most cost effective option but which is best for you. If you're able to walk with a rollator using that as much as possible will be beneficial. Using a scooter is a different kettle of fish. It may be that both are beneficial - the rollator for short distances and the scooter for longer ones. I use a scooter but I can barely walk at all and use it like a wheelchair.

    I have a boot scooter (so that I can get it into the car and manouvre in small places) but it does great on uneven pavements and park type places too.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    1,484
    Mobility scooters have lead batteries and take a slow charge....over night is best and you are advised to keep it topped up. Its just like having one appliance on overnight. So running costs...not bad. If you buy brand new, I'd advise insurance. Repairs can be costly and unexpected.
    I'd research locally as to what SIZE or class of scooters buses will let on. I've got a "pavement scooter" but I can't see it getting on our buses - whereas my wheelchair does.
    So no cost, is not always the deciding factor...lots of things to consider, like I said.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    South Lanarkshire
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by reddivine View Post
    Both or either can be brought fairly reasonably 2nd hand. to give you an idea...i have just been GIVEN a scooter, paid @ £150 for new batteries and a service and new charger. now have to wait for a better entrance to enable me to get in/out the house!
    So: thing to consider;
    where will i store it?
    can I walk at all? (for the rollator)
    can I go on buses and trains? (not so much with the scooter)
    the running cost of a scooter is not bad - its the initial outlay.
    Try preloved, or look locally for 2nd hand one first.
    You can go on trains with your scooter...as long as you phone the station you are leaving from to arrange a ramp to get onto the train and off at your destination ..the railway staff are usually very helpful and more than willing to help. I would not be able to go out at all without my scooter.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Greater London
    Posts
    335
    Hello again,

    Thanks for your thoughts, here's a bit more information.

    I've got secondary progressive MS.
    I live in a block of flats (but have a ground floor shed)
    I walk very unstably these days and verrrry slooooowly, I regularly bang into things (even in my own home) not to mention ending up on my derrière on the pavement sometimes. (And no, I hadn't been drinking wobbly water)
    I live about a third of a mile from any public transport and the local train stations are not fully accessible (it takes me about 45 minutes these days to walk to the bus stop and I have to take frequent breaks, it used to take about 8minutes and I didn't need to stop)
    I don't drive and never have.
    My husband can no longer drive and we don't own a car.

    All I'd like to do is be able to go a couple of mile away to the doctors when needed or 3 or 4 miles away to the pictures occasionally or go to the local high street sometimes without it being a drama, I nipped out to the high street the other day, I was taken there and back and was I still gone for more than 4 hours! Hardly nipping out! I got home a physical wreck and I'm still suffering the after effects.

    I guess I'd like to get a bit of a life! And now I've been awarded a mobility allowance a pavement scooter is a more of a possibility than I'd believed before purely because of the cost.
    Signing off

    Merry Christmas.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    South Lanarkshire
    Posts
    95
    Quote Originally Posted by Archersmate View Post
    Hello again,

    Thanks for your thoughts, here's a bit more information.

    I've got secondary progressive MS.
    I live in a block of flats (but have a ground floor shed)
    I walk very unstably these days and verrrry slooooowly, I regularly bang into things (even in my own home) not to mention ending up on my derrière on the pavement sometimes. (And no, I hadn't been drinking wobbly water)
    I live about a third of a mile from any public transport and the local train stations are not fully accessible (it takes me about 45 minutes these days to walk to the bus stop and I have to take frequent breaks, it used to take about 8minutes and I didn't need to stop)
    I don't drive and never have.
    My husband can no longer drive and we don't own a car.

    All I'd like to do is be able to go a couple of mile away to the doctors when needed or 3 or 4 miles away to the pictures occasionally or go to the local high street sometimes without it being a drama, I nipped out to the high street the other day, I was taken there and back and was I still gone for more than 4 hours! Hardly nipping out! I got home a physical wreck and I'm still suffering the after effects.

    I guess I'd like to get a bit of a life! And now I've been awarded a mobility allowance a pavement scooter is a more of a possibility than I'd believed before purely because of the cost.
    Signing off

    Merry Christmas.
    Hi ...I live at the back end of my town where there are no buses available so I would need to go a fair distance to reach a bus stop and train station and I don't drive either. I had to buy a wee scooter because I can hardly walk at all...just about cross my livingroom holding onto the furniture and sitting down as I go...so I think, in your case, a scooter would be much more useful to you because without mine I would be completely housebound. Good luck to you in your quest and hope you get what you need.

Similar Threads

  1. how long
    By dickson in forum News and general discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-09-14, 17:08
  2. How long does it take
    By Fizzypink in forum Motoring - help & advice on cars for disabled people, Blue Badge and Motability
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 29-08-14, 18:39
  3. How long? IB to ESA
    By Jay123 in forum Benefits - help & advice on disability benefits, incapacity benefits, ESA and DLA
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-05-13, 14:57
  4. How long is long enough
    By allconfused in forum Benefits - help & advice on disability benefits, incapacity benefits, ESA and DLA
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 21-09-12, 04:10
  5. how long does it take !!
    By maggieomx in forum Benefits - help & advice on disability benefits, incapacity benefits, ESA and DLA
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 18-07-12, 23:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •