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Thread: Jeremy Corbyn: a halt to the onslaught?

  1. #11
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    we can only hope. paul25

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul25 View Post
    we can only hope. paul25
    Yes indeed Paul - we can but hope! One has to have hope to carry on!

    Buster

  3. #13
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    Well Labour have decided to vote against George Osborne's fiscal charter with the exception of a few MPs who abstained. In terms of hope and at least having some kind of political representation this bodes well for the sick and disabled who are forced to rely on disability benefits such as ESA, DLA and PIP. However, the government has won the vote so it looks like the fiscal charter will at some point become law. If the charter does become law it will give Osborne or any successor even more of an excuse to further dismantle the welfare state - to the detriment of people who are unable to earn a wage through no fault of their own - such as many users of this forum. This will lead to more hardship and social injustice - the sick and disabled will be hit with the proverbial Tory sledgehammer once again. According to shadow chancellor John McDonnell - if government current and capital spending is constrained over the next four years as Osborne is proposing - it will result in cuts to welfare totalling an additional £35 Billion. This would make the current round of £12 Billion of welfare cuts look pretty small in comparison. Therefore, it seems to me, if Osborne and the government get their way with the charter, there will certainly be no end to the onslaught concerning the sick and disabled.

    Buster

  4. #14
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    Regarding the reference to John McDonnell can we assume that he won't change his mind again?
    Caring is an art not a science

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcclonk View Post
    Regarding the reference to John McDonnell can we assume that he won't change his mind again?
    That's a very good point, I don't think we should ever assume that anybody especially MPs won't ever change their minds. For example, in 2010 George Osborne rejected chancellor Gordon Brown's fiscal charter; Osborne at the time called Brown's attempt to curtail future government current spending a "political gimmick" - Osborne didn't want anything to do with it. Now of course Osborne has changed his mind about fiscal charters - apparently, he now thinks a charter would be a good idea after all - I kid you not!

    Additionally, during this year's general election campaign PM David Cameron told BBC presenter David Dimbleby that the government would not be cutting Child Tax Credits. Just two months later Cameron had changed his mind - his chancellor George Osborne announced the government would be cutting children's credits after all - resulting in 3.5 million families being worse off by an average of £1,300.00 a year - immediately plunging another 300,000 children in to poverty. The PM also changed his mind on wanting to protect sickness benefits for the most vulnerable. For example, in May this year Cameron's stance was that the most vulnerable people incapable of work would be no worse off under a Tory government. Of course just two months later the Tory government announced sweeping cuts to ESA - to kick in in April 2017.

    So, yes, in conclusion I think one has to say that we should never assume that MPs won't ever change their minds - because they do - all the time - history tells us!

    Buster
    Last edited by buster21; 16-10-15 at 08:53.

  6. #16
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    Lightbulb

    Had a change of thought

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Popeye View Post
    Had a change of thought
    I'm not sure what your point is Popeye? Unless of course it's "gone over my head" - if so, I apologise. Seriously though this thread is supposed to be about whether or not the establishment (especially the mass-media) will eventually relinquish their obsessive and negative onslaught against the vulnerable - particularly the sick and disabled, now that Corbyn is opposition leader? As we now have an opposition who are unashamedly speaking up for and representing the sick and disabled in addition to other vulnerable groups - hopefully, the government's ideological relentless drive to further impoverish society's most vulnerable will start to abate? Basically, we might at last see some balance and fairness entering the political arena - in terms of how people are viewed. This is my hope anyway. It's a serious topic - so, please feel free to debate this important issue. After all - it's peoples' lives we're talking about.

    Buster
    Last edited by buster21; 24-10-15 at 12:09.

  8. #18
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    there are some interesting pointers emerging in the last couple of weeks,corbyns net approval rating is -2% camerons is -19%,so corbyn in more popular,we also now have a functioning opposition,although it remains a fact that with a narrow majority the tories opposition is now handful of their own MPs
    we will have to wait and see what effect all this has on osbornes autumn statement at the end of the month,my bet is it will be softened a little round the edges and that he will aim for a surplus a little later than he originally suggested in the budget.

  9. #19
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    Wooders, one poll I saw today had Corbyn at -20 and Cameron at -4. To be honest I think we can all take polls with a pinch of salt. I agree we do now have a functioning opposition - in a sense that it's no longer just swallowing the Tory pill and regurgitating the government's austerity policies, fearful of what the mass-media might say about them. It's a refreshing change if nothing else. Although I think the odds are stacked massively against Corbyn ever becoming PM - or for that matter Labour being elected in 2020 whoever is its leader. I would love to be wrong of course. Anyway, at least with Corbyn and his team now in opposition disabled and sick people might just have a chance of seeing an end to the seemingly unchecked attacks on their well-being - thanks to the Conservative's so called Welfare Reform. You never know Labour might pile the pressure on the Tories and eventually embarrass the government (with a little help from the media) in to curtailing its onslaught against the vulnerable and weak? And if Corbyn and Labour were to start polling significantly better in the opinion polls, we might even see things improve (not get any worse) sooner rather than later. At least that's the hope anyway. Maybe I'm being a bit naive and hoping for too much?

    Buster
    Last edited by buster21; 03-11-15 at 13:57.

  10. #20
    The majority of voters will only change their tune if they are directly effected. For example when Tax Credits where cut poor Tory voters where appalled yet that didn't stop them voting Conservative when they knew full well that there was a high chance of welfare cuts would impact the disabled.

    It looks like George Osborne may do a U-Turn and turn his gaze back towards us & spare recipients of Tax Credits. If this happens there will be little chance that Jeremy Corbyn will win the 2020 election.

    In times of economic crisis people do not care about the disabled. Its a un-compassionate reality but it is the truth.

    I personally would advise every disabled person to get as close to Scotland or Labour controlled areas as they can because if people think 2010 to 2015 was bad this next 5 years is going to be a complete tribulation for us disabled folk.

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