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Thread: Jeremy Corbyn: a halt to the onslaught?

  1. #1
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    Jeremy Corbyn: a halt to the onslaught?

    Now that Jeremy Corbyn has finally been elected as Labour and therefore opposition leader, it is expected that he will realign not only politics of the Labour Party but also of British politics as a whole. Basically, Corbyn's fresh ideas on many things, particularly around social justice, including having a fit for purpose social security system for the sick and disabled of Britain, arguably, will force the Tory government to move back to the centre ground of politics in terms of future policy decisions; this is likely to halt the Tories in their tracks and therefore stop their continual onslaught against the most vulnerable in society. Surely, it will be much harder now for the Tories to getaway with removing disability benefits in order to pay for ideologically driven austerity policies. This is my opinion anyway - I could be wrong, however, I believe Corbyn's victory at least signals optimism in terms of halting the savage Tory cuts and putting the ESA WCA under much needed scrutiny - not to mention PIP assessments. It would be very interesting to hear your views on this.

    Buster

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    I would draw your attention to an item in the current issue of ‘Private Eye’ magazine which on page 7 shows an image of David Cameron under the heading “LABOUR LEADERSHIP RESULT”. There is a huge grin across his face and he gives a thumbs-up on his hand held high above his head. Out of his mouth there is a speech balloon containing the words “Best three quid I’ve ever spent”.

    On the front cover of the same magazine there’s a photo of your hero Jeremy Corbyn. He is smiling with his hand held high as though he is waving. The speech balloon states “Wave goodbye to the 2020 election!”

    Buster, I would suggest that the above is indicative of the majority opinion in the UK.

    Chris

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    I sincerely hope that Corbyn will be able to do something to temper the inhumane way the Tories are treating the poor and disabled, but however much he disagrees with their policies, as a majority Government, the Tories can pretty much do what they like. I don't understand much about politics but I really don't know whether Corbyn is going to make Labour more electable - and we've another 5 years of Tory cuts and sanctions until we've any chance at all of getting rid of them!

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    Caley, I agree, I too hope Jeremy Corbyn will be able to do something to temper Tory inhumanity shown towards the poor and disabled. Jeremy is already making a good fist of it, in my opinion - so, let's hope he keeps up the good work - for all of our sakes! Remember, the Tories only have a working majority of 14 MPs within parliament, so, I wouldn't be so sure they will be able to keep on getting their way for the next five years or so; things will probably get a little dodgy for them - thanks to ineptness and sleaze.

    Buster

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    Ineptness and sleaze................Two words synonymous with G. Brown and T. Blair.......

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    Quote Originally Posted by stree View Post
    Ineptness and sleaze................Two words synonymous with G. Brown and T. Blair.......
    Couldn't agree more. That's why Jeremy Corbyn and his brilliant shadow chancellor John McDonnell will not make the same mistakes if elected in 2020. There will be no more wars, no more cosying up to Murdoch (Blair was Murdoch's son's godfather) and no more bottom up approach to paying for the financial crisis. I don't know how long it will last but for the time being Labour will unashamedly speak up for the poor and vulnerable in society, including the sick and disabled. Now that can't be a bad thing can it?

    Buster

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    In a way Corbyn is like Farage and UKIT, not in terms of policies, although Corbyn did use to advocate the UK leaving the EU (I'm not sure I, or even he, knows what his policy is now), but rather the impact on the political landscape.

    Labour moves further to the left (UKIP forced the Tories to move further to the right). Each political party will worry about his message and perceived popularity and shift accordingly. However, as with UKIP, his policies will unravel under further scrutiny and the promises will be just that promises. Even the worthy ones.

    Unfortunately, the political shifts made by other parties, albeit unwarranted, will remain in place.

    Corbyn, and much of his shadow cabinet, are not only a danger to the Labour Party, perhaps forcing a new party to form, but ultimately a danger to the whole political landscape. We need a strong opposition, regardless of who is in power, but unfortunately we don't have one.
    No single thing can define me; not my work, not my politics, not my hobbies, not my vices and not my disability. I'm way more complex than that!

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    Interesting view from Vantage. However, I don't believe that the recent political shifts will remain in place, in particular, the Tories remaining as far right-wing as they currently are. I believe the Tories will be forced to adopt more of the centre ground of politics and that their policies will hopefully in turn be less harsh on vulnerable people within our society, for example, sick and disabled people. So, basically I can see the Tories becoming a little more inclusive in their approach - but not by choice or because they all of a sudden have a "heart" but because of the realignment of British politics - for the better in my opinion.

    Incidentally, Vantage why do you think Labour are a danger to politics? They were in government only five years ago - what has changed - why are they now dangerous? I find this hard to believe. To reiterate, Labour from now on will speak up for the most vulnerable in society such as the sick and disabled - this has got to be a good thing - hasn't it? Because the Conservative government certainly aren't doing it!

    Buster

    Buster

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    Buster,

    Sorry you have misunderstood me. I don't believe Labour as a political party are a danger to politics I believe Jeremy Corbyn and others in his Shadow Cabinet are. His warm, inviting, rhetoric pulls people in but the reality is something completely different. The Greek people have just experienced an example of this. Alexis Tsipras offered to solve all of Greeces problems when getting elected, the end of austerity etc, but the reality is now somewhat different. The situation is Greece is much worse then before he was elected and he has imposed more austerity.

    I hope the Tories do return to the centre. This will happen as Labour move to the left and UKIP disappears as a political force.
    No single thing can define me; not my work, not my politics, not my hobbies, not my vices and not my disability. I'm way more complex than that!

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    Hi Vantage, thank you for the clarification, consequently, I think we will have to agree to disagree - I do believe you are completely wrong. Anyway, it makes for a healthy debate - I'm sure. This week, It's been an interesting party conference for Labour; Corbyn's speech was excellent - as was his deputy leader Tom Watson's as well as shadow chancellor John Mc Donnell's respective speeches - rousing stuff - honest straight talking politics - standing up for the sick and disabled. All three spoke up for sick and disabled benefit claimants suffering at the hands of the DWP's controversial ESA work capability assessment - citing publicised tragic cases which have resulted in injustices and even death for some. I don't recall any other political party let alone any disabled charity groups who are similarly unashamedly standing up for these vulnerable people - highlighting the governments failings in the hope that the system can change for the better. This is a big shift from Labour's previous position prior to Jeremy Corbyn coming on to the scene. In my opinion, it's lovely to see some compassion in politics - with the sick and disabled being politically represented - this can't be a bad thing can it?

    Buster

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