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Thread: The Queen's Speech - what do you reckon to the budge

  1. #11
    xombie89
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    Get lost on the way to the mail?

    very desirable to continue the measures needed to resolve the country from its ongoing financial difficulties.
    By spending more than labour, taking a hands off approach to tax evasion and robbing more disabled people for the sub-standard welfare they get?

    The disabled are truly the heroes the UK needs. They will erect gold wheelchair statues outside every town hall once the "debt" we've been in for over 200 years is cleared. Maybe then we will get the living wage for being the tories meat shield.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by xombie89 View Post
    Get lost on the way to the mail?



    By spending more than labour, taking a hands off approach to tax evasion and robbing more disabled people for the sub-standard welfare they get?

    The disabled are truly the heroes the UK needs. They will erect gold wheelchair statues outside every town hall once the "debt" we've been in for over 200 years is cleared. Maybe then we will get the living wage for being the tories meat shield.
    Interesting first post Xombie, but so wrong on so many levels.
    When an economy is back on a sound footing, then there us more money to spend
    Tax evasion? Great, it's even Englishmans right and should fe, to pay the least amount of tax possible, as this is a theft from hard working people
    Please stop with these idiotic comments that all disabled are being put upon, many are not, many are working and paying tax and contributing to society. This should be what all disabled wish to do to their individual ability. No person able or disabled should see benefits as a wage as you seem to think it is.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    David Cameron’s government has just told us – via the Queen – what it plans to do over the course of the next parliament. None of what’s been proposed is especially new compared to what we were told before the election.

    Europe: legislation is being put forward to ensure a referendum on EU membership before the end of 2017.

    Tax: as promised pre-election, there’s a ban on raising income tax, VAT and national insurance for the next five years. This was clearly done for electoral purposes. So what will the Government tax - we’ll get a better idea of what’ll happen come the next Budget on Wednesday, 8 July 2015.

    Welfare reform: there are a number of changes including reducing the maximum level of household benefits that can be claimed from £26,000 a year to £23,000, plus a two-year freeze on most working-age benefits, including unemployment benefit, child benefit, and tax credits, from 2016/17 (although if inflation remains at or near current levels, those benefits would likely have been frozen in any case). However, the government still has to spell out exactly how it’s going to save £12bn a year from the welfare budget. For working parents, there’s a goal of 30 hours free childcare a week for three and four-year-olds by 2017.

    Housing: 1.3 million housing association tenants who have lived in their homes for three years or more will get the right to buy their properties. Discounts could be worth as much as £102,700 in London and £77,000 elsewhere. The government also wants to see 200,000 new starter homes built (primarily on brownfield land), with these being sold to first-time buyers under 40 at a 20% discount.

    The question is - there's a depleting number of social houses - not everyone can afford to buy - where are new social houses being built?

    Cities, devolution, and the ‘northern powerhouse’: this is all about expanding the powers given to regions, as long as they agree to have an elected mayor. Greater Manchester is the first area – the ‘northern powerhouse’ – being targeted.
    Last edited by Lighttouch; 28-05-15 at 10:36.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lighttouch View Post
    David Cameron’s government has just told us – via the Queen – what it plans to do over the course of the next parliament. None of what’s been proposed is especially new compared to what we were told before the election.

    Europe: legislation is being put forward to ensure a referendum on EU membership before the end of 2017.

    Tax: as promised pre-election, there’s a ban on raising income tax, VAT and national insurance for the next five years. This was clearly done for electoral purposes. So what will the Government tax - we’ll get a better idea of what’ll happen come the next Budget on Wednesday, 8 July 2015.

    Welfare reform: there are a number of changes including reducing the maximum level of household benefits that can be claimed from £26,000 a year to £23,000, plus a two-year freeze on most working-age benefits, including unemployment benefit, child benefit, and tax credits, from 2016/17 (although if inflation remains at or near current levels, those benefits would likely have been frozen in any case). However, the government still has to spell out exactly how it’s going to save £12bn a year from the welfare budget. For working parents, there’s a goal of 30 hours free childcare a week for three and four-year-olds by 2017.

    Housing: 1.3 million housing association tenants who have lived in their homes for three years or more will get the right to buy their properties. Discounts could be worth as much as £102,700 in London and £77,000 elsewhere. The government also wants to see 200,000 new starter homes built (primarily on brownfield land), with these being sold to first-time buyers under 40 at a 20% discount.

    The question is - there's a depleting number of social houses - not everyone can afford to buy - where are new social houses being built?

    Cities, devolution, and the ‘northern powerhouse’: this is all about expanding the powers given to regions, as long as they agree to have an elected mayor. Greater Manchester is the first area – the ‘northern powerhouse’ – being targeted.
    I think the Queen's speech was just a whole lot of claptrap designed to appease the almost exclusively right-wing Tory press. For example, even by reducing the overall household benefits cap from £26,000 to £23,000, this will have hardly any impact at all in terms of saving money. According to the IFS this new cap will result in a saving of only 0.1 billion pounds - 100 million pounds out of an annual budget of 125 billion pounds - 125 thousand million pounds. The saving in percentage terms equates to only 0.08% of total spend on working age benefits (£125 billion); therefore, why all the much trumpeted fanfare and over the top hype surrounding the pretty insignificant benefit cap (unless you are a victim of course)? Why do the establishment feel the need to use the Queen to make people believe that the benefit cap is a huge answer to welfare savings and therefore helping to eradicate the annual budget deficit? - when obviously and in fact - it evidently is most certainly not.

    According to the IFS, freezing all benefits (working age) until the end of the next parliament (2020) would result in a very significant saving of some £4.5 billion pounds; although unpopular this would go a long way in getting to that "magic" figure of £12 billion - the Conservatives target. In my opinion this might have been a more coherent and balanced option to have been included in the Queen's speech rather than a benefit cap. Although, to be absolutely clear, I believe these planned cuts are really all about shrinking the welfare state and the state in general - to satisfy Tory ideology - which historically has always been against any form of financial assistance for the vulnerable whatsoever. The Tories therefore feel they are still justified in using the excuse of deficit reduction; well, I believe they deliberately missed their targets under the last coalition government - so as to keep using the same old lame excuses - in their efforts to crush the poor once and for all.

    Buster

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lighttouch View Post
    David Cameron’s government has just told us – via the Queen – what it plans to do over the course of the next parliament. None of what’s been proposed is especially new compared to what we were told before the election.

    Europe: legislation is being put forward to ensure a referendum on EU membership before the end of 2017.

    Tax: as promised pre-election, there’s a ban on raising income tax, VAT and national insurance for the next five years. This was clearly done for electoral purposes. So what will the Government tax - we’ll get a better idea of what’ll happen come the next Budget on Wednesday, 8 July 2015.

    Welfare reform: there are a number of changes including reducing the maximum level of household benefits that can be claimed from £26,000 a year to £23,000, plus a two-year freeze on most working-age benefits, including unemployment benefit, child benefit, and tax credits, from 2016/17 (although if inflation remains at or near current levels, those benefits would likely have been frozen in any case). However, the government still has to spell out exactly how it’s going to save £12bn a year from the welfare budget. For working parents, there’s a goal of 30 hours free childcare a week for three and four-year-olds by 2017.

    Housing: 1.3 million housing association tenants who have lived in their homes for three years or more will get the right to buy their properties. Discounts could be worth as much as £102,700 in London and £77,000 elsewhere. The government also wants to see 200,000 new starter homes built (primarily on brownfield land), with these being sold to first-time buyers under 40 at a 20% discount.

    The question is - there's a depleting number of social houses - not everyone can afford to buy - where are new social houses being built?

    Cities, devolution, and the ‘northern powerhouse’: this is all about expanding the powers given to regions, as long as they agree to have an elected mayor. Greater Manchester is the first area – the ‘northern powerhouse’ – being targeted.
    By the way, strictly speaking, it is the Queen's government (although unelected) and not David Cameron's government as you allude.

    Buster

  6. #16
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    Benefits cap at £23,000
    Don't make me laugh, my P60u for last year was £5,273 (for ESA).
    I also got £3,120 Housing Ben. which doesn't appear on the P60.
    So £8393 total. Would love to be even half way to that cap.

    Northern Powerhouse
    If Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds are to become the "Northern Powerhouse" what about the rest of us in England that live even further North?
    I'm 145 miles North from Manchester, and what about Newcastle 105 miles North of Leeds.
    Where does this leave us true Northerners? Should we vote to join Scotland?

    Awaiting the budget with interest to see what they will cut whilst shouting loudly about HARD WORKING FAMILIES being better off, when we all know that even that is not true..
    I don't know everything. - But I'm good at searching for, and finding, stuff.

    Migration from ESA to Universal Credit- Click here for information.

  7. #17
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    The freezing of benefits (working age) was in the Conservative manifesto and I believe they will do this. This, I believe, does not require any new legislation and hence was not mentioned in the Queens Speech.

    The Queens Speech tends to focus on new legislation and as such does not limit what the Government will do. The budget will provide more information on benefit changes.
    No single thing can define me; not my work, not my politics, not my hobbies, not my vices and not my disability. I'm way more complex than that!

  8. #18
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    Britain's financial debt at the time I'm writing this very message is £1,490,317,860,629. For the current total when you read this, see http://www.debtbombshell.com/

    Money does NOT grow on trees, it has to come from somewhere.

    Chris

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