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Thread: Controlling Neuropathic Pain

  1. #21
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaff79 View Post
    I take Pregabalin for neuropathic pain. It is similar to gabapentin but with less side affects. I have got on really well with it. I also have a scary list of meds, considering i drive a d work full time!! Naproxen, Zapain, Oramorph for breakthrough pain and fentynol patches. Im going to have some experimental treatment this month with aenesthetic! Im v looking forward to it!! I would recommend Pregabalin. It took 6 weeks ish for side affects to calm down, the relief I get is life changing.
    The only time that I've been completely pain free was after surgery on my knee. I'd had a general anaesthetic to knock me out for a 20 minute operation. When I came around in the ward shortly after the operation I didn't notice any pain in my knee.

    More importantly I had no pain anywhere! It was heaven sent. However, 24 hours later was a different story. It must be great being pain free. The funny thing is people who are pain free don't cherish that 'gift' until it disappears.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul View Post
    PENS- Percutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation
    It's similar to a TENS machine but the electrodes are inserted under the skin - https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ipg450

    If you get the chance to speak to a consultant, ask about RF Nerve Ablation - it worked for me and has reduced my secondary (sciatic like) pain by 90%. The original pain is still there, but at least now I can drive and work! http://www.bupa.co.uk/jahia/webdav/s...enervation.pdf

    My current meds would scare most other people, especially as I drive and work full-time! I'm taking Fentanyl patches, Tramadol for breakthrough pain, Naproxen, Paracetamol and more recently Propranolol for chronic migraine. << That isn't a complete list either!

    I have taken Gabapentin and Amitriptyline in the past but with no success, or side effects.

    <sorry about the spelling, haven't slept for a few nights>
    Interesting reading about PENS, after all the pain I have had for years I am most anxious about the procedure hurting! Im such a wimp when it comes to needles.
    I also work full time and driving is a big part of my job, so at weekends I can take more pain relief than I do through the week, its all trila and error I suppose.
    Thanks for the info Paul

  3. #23
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Rubyred, you would have run a mile at the thought of what I experienced on Friday.

    I paid to visit my local physiotherapist and get pain relief for my back.

    She used dry needles for acupuncture. I had to strip off and lie on my front. She stuck needles in my lumber region, buttock, back of thigh and calf. The needles help to relax the muscles. Then she rubs in a cream and finally gives a deep massage to unknot hard muscles.

    It's really very relaxing and you feel a lot less pain for at least 48 hours.

  4. #24
    Senior Member AmyS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lighttouch View Post
    Rubyred, you would have run a mile at the thought of what I experienced on Friday.

    I paid to visit my local physiotherapist and get pain relief for my back.

    She used dry needles for acupuncture. I had to strip off and lie on my front. She stuck needles in my lumber region, buttock, back of thigh and calf. The needles help to relax the muscles. Then she rubs in a cream and finally gives a deep massage to unknot hard muscles.

    It's really very relaxing and you feel a lot less pain for at least 48 hours.
    I tried acupuncture and they had to stop as it made me so unwell, nauseous, physically sick - never again lol. This was after I had a motorcycle accident and injured my neck, spine, right shoulder, right arm. Shows what works for one person has different effects on another.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Amy, the reason why you felt so bad was because your mind went into overdrive as to what was happening and you made yourself ill.

    Sticking a needle into skin won't harm you - your brain has taken over and created a story that revolts you - that's why you were ill. Hypnotherapy could sort out your fear of needles in my opinion.

  6. #26
    Senior Member AmyS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lighttouch View Post
    Amy, the reason why you felt so bad was because your mind went into overdrive as to what was happening and you made yourself ill.

    Sticking a needle into skin won't harm you - your brain has taken over and created a story that revolts you - that's why you were ill. Hypnotherapy could sort out your fear of needles in my opinion.
    Needles don't worry me at all, also I was face down - I come from a family of doctors, nurses, pharmacists nothing to do with a needle. Why would a needle revolt me?

  7. #27
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Well, as a teenager I worked on a farm during the weekends.

    I would frequently be given the worst jobs - the ones that would make people feel sick - like ceaning out the hens poop from one of several battery hen houses that keep 2000 chickens in each.

    The very thought of cleaning slops out of a hen house would make them reach at the thought.

    Acupuncture involves needles and they can't cause vomiting - they aren't taken internally - you can't be poisened by them/ It's the thought of having a needle pushed into you that causes the nausea not the needle itself.

    I probably had 15-20 needles stuck in me for just a few minutes before they were taken out. I was chatting with my physio when she was inserting them. They didn't make me feel sick as I wasn't thinking about them.

    The power of your brain caused you to feel all those symptoms not acupuncture,

  8. #28
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
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    LT, I disagree with your theory.
    The needles are put into the skin in the painful areas or in the median lines, depending on which method of acupuncture is used, i.e. the straightforward type or the type that is used in Asia. The purpose of these needles is to cause an irritation that will encourage the release of endomorphines to the area of pain. Endomorphines are the body's own natural painkiller.
    If a body cannot tolerate the excess of these then nausea is likely to occur as a reaction in someone who is sensitive to them. A bit like an overdose really.

    I have been having acupuncture almost weekly for the past 9 months to help with knee and hip pain, luckily with no ill effects.
    15 to 20 needles for a few minutes is nothing. I have twice as many as that and they are left in for 30 minutes for maximum effect.

  9. #29
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    My mother had acupuncture once and did had a similar experience to AmyS. My mother is also a bit of a pin cushion, having many injections for various reasons, so has no fear of needles

    I think people's bodies react to things in different ways - it is not always psychological.

  10. #30
    Senior Member AmyS's Avatar
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    I didn't feel the needles - no pain relief at all - I had more than 20 needles.

    I paid privately had a neck-brace on, arm in sling and no relief, removed them to lie face down and needed help to take my top off - came out feeling sick. Not going to elaborate - and given up trying to explain - as you seem to think I have a fear of needles, no idea why.

    Quote Originally Posted by rich-ward View Post
    My mother had acupuncture once and did had a similar experience to AmyS. My mother is also a bit of a pin cushion, having many injections for various reasons, so has no fear of needles

    I think people's bodies react to things in different ways - it is not always psychological.
    Thanks rich-ward - we are all different

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